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View Full Version : Has London 2012 been a success?


squelchy18
12-08-2012, 05:37 PM
Not long after it was announced that London will host the Olympic games, many people thought we would mess it up. Either with our transport system or just the facilities.

Even just a few months ago when the news of the corporate bullshit emerged like McDonalds' stranglehold on chips or the prohibiting of the use of the word 'Olympic' people, including myself thought it was gonna be a load of shit. This was highlighted on the "Olympic whinge thread" right here on the BBS.

I did eventually find myself watching the opening ceremony and thought it was brilliant, and after the first round of events were played, I completely ignored all the past critcisms I had and was completely engrossed.

All across London, the vibe could be felt and for a change it actually seemed a cheerful place to be. I honestly feel this has been the best Olympic games in my lifetime and will take something special to top it. I even thought that before I went to an event. The facilities, the vibe, the success of the home team and the sheer spectacle twinned with London's unique character contributed to this and Olympic Park is a fantastic place to be.

As Brits, we always seem to be a bit pessimistic when the world is relying on us to make something happen, but we always pull it out of the hat and impress.

Thoughts?

eaglejez
12-08-2012, 05:43 PM
been a disaster from day 1 and all the doomsayers have been proved correct









apart from the great opening ceremony, the brilliant organisation of everything (apart from 1 flag and losing that American bloke...arguably good things), the 70,000 cheery helpers, the great weather, the amazing crowds, the record medal haul, the biggest feelgood factor for the British (apart from PK) and the French falling for the 'they've got rounder wheels' gag in the cycling :)

SpikeyMatt
12-08-2012, 05:45 PM
We went and smashed it.

I was indifferent on Thursday July 26th but 24 hours later I was completely encapsulated. It's been completely and utterly brilliant - we do these things amazingly well.

Never had as great a feeling or sense of pride in my national identity as I have over the past fortnight. So yeah, it's been pretty good :)

eaglejez
12-08-2012, 05:47 PM
....the lack of travel problems, the ease of access into and out of the venues, the disabled access, the greedy hoteliers getting stung.......:p

eaglejez
12-08-2012, 05:49 PM
.....the rest of the world seeing Britain as a vibrant multicultural integrated joyous collection of people who are pretty good at organising big events, yay even with a touch of humour.................:)

Icy
12-08-2012, 06:09 PM
We went and smashed it.

I was indifferent on Thursday July 26th but 24 hours later I was completely encapsulated. It's been completely and utterly brilliant - we do these things amazingly well.

Never had as great a feeling or sense of pride in my national identity as I have over the past fortnight. So yeah, it's been pretty good :)

Sums it up for me.

hull eagle
12-08-2012, 06:14 PM
Well I didn't have the chance to go but ill say this.......for me i have enjoyed it from beginning to end, Britain has done us and the rest of the world proud in what has arguably been the best Olympics ever, we've shown the world what were made of and we can stand up and be counted even though we are small in comparison to some

Pistol Knight
12-08-2012, 06:21 PM
I was a "nayer" but the BBC coverage has been top notch and worth the license fee alone for the year, got sucked into it really, which has been a nice distraction from the usual doom & gloom new reports and papers full of BS, A HUGE success


I hope Sepp Blatter has been looking in, what would a World cup be like here

Congrats have to go to successive governments and Lord Coe for delivering something to be proud of, where are all the people who said you could never top Bejing, IMO we have its been great fun

davematt
12-08-2012, 06:30 PM
We went and smashed it.

I was indifferent on Thursday July 26th but 24 hours later I was completely encapsulated. It's been completely and utterly brilliant - we do these things amazingly well.

Never had as great a feeling or sense of pride in my national identity as I have over the past fortnight. So yeah, it's been pretty good :)

This.

Its been a spectacular masterpiece from start to finish.

Going to be near impossible to hold back tears this evening!

saxoneagle
12-08-2012, 06:33 PM
I was a "nayer" but the BBC coverage has been top notch and worth the license fee alone for the year, got sucked into it really, which has been a nice distraction from the usual doom & gloom new reports and papers full of BS, A HUGE success


I hope Sepp Blatter has been looking in, what would a World cup be like here

Congrats have to go to successive governments and Lord Coe for delivering something to be proud of, where are all the people who said you could never top Bejing, IMO we have its been great fun

**** FIFA. They don't deserve us.

Major respect for Coe, the bid team and all involved.

Magic.

strawberry mivi
12-08-2012, 06:37 PM
This must have been the best attended games ever?
Pictures of Sydney with empty stadiums - London didn't come close to that, even the 'obscure' sports.

Biggineagle
12-08-2012, 06:38 PM
We went and smashed it. Quite. Nail on head:p

AJ's right boot
12-08-2012, 06:41 PM
It surely must be regarded as the greatest games ever. It's been incredible, I'm genuinely gutted it's finishing. And I feel sorry for the few stick in the muds that refused to watch any of it, because they have missed something special.

Adlerhorst
12-08-2012, 06:43 PM
It surely must be regarded as the greatest games ever. It's been incredible, I'm genuinely gutted it's finishing. And I feel sorry for the few stick in the muds that refused to watch any of it, because they have missed something special.
These games have had personality, which was sorely lacking in the Beijing / Alderley Edge games.

Whilst it is hard to compare, a number of games go down as memorable. Barcelona, Sydney and London for being good in their own individual ways, and Atlanta for being utterly awful in almost every way.

dan27
12-08-2012, 06:50 PM
Yes. 100% and that number doesn't do it justice.

I've always been extremely proud of my country and the opening ceremony was an absolute masterpiece that struck a chord with every patriotic bone in body and set up what would be an absolutely wonderful games.

From Glover and Stanning to Wilson, Stott and Bailey, I have been overwhelmed by every athlete to pull on a Team GB jersey and represent the nation in sports that I really had little to zero interest in before the games. I have cheered on every athlete in a whole variety of different sports and every single one of them has made me proud (with the exception of the football team who I had zero interest in and little pride to say they hail from our isles).

The events which I am naturally drawn to and have always been interested in in the hockey and the cycling have also been fantastic and seeing the glee on the girls' hockey team when they won bronze on friday was a joy to behold. I've told my mates who will listen for years how strong they are and how proud the hockey and cycling athletes are to represent their country, be it England or GB and they have more than lived up to my billing. I am so proud of them.

I have been so overwhelmed by the spectacle on the television that I knew I had to go east to London to experience it for myself and on tuesday I went to the triathlon and I must say the atmosphere was immense. Second to none. I think I will look back on my decision to go to watch the triathlon and then sit and watch the afternoon and evening events in the BT Hyde Park Arena and think that it was one of the best decisions of my life. I would have kicked myself to have missed out on experiencing the utter utter feel good factor and sense of national pride that was, to be honest, almost tangible - and that wasn't even in one of the venues!

Hearing the national anthem sung so loud and so proud and seeing the athletes visibly overwhelmed with joy during the medal ceremonies were moments that made me so proud to be British. It was so obvious when our medalists were on the podium that they really were representing us, the people of Great Britain, and were honoured to do so.

The unity that the games have instilled in the country is the cherry on top, 99.9% of the country are, at this very moment in time, inspired by what has occurred these last 16 days and by God I hope that continues. I have never felt more at home in a country that I have never ever felt out of place in, and whilst that may seem odd, for me that is an absolutely marvelous accomplishment of the games. We live in what is a very proud country, but a country that is very quick to put itself down and often needs a reminder of just how great it really is, and this summer we have been given a reminder that I hope we will never ever forget. The country needed a lift and it has got more than that from these games and I am so so pleased and proud to have been alive during them and to have been able to be a part of them, however small my part might have been, I am over the moon to be able to look back and say "London 2012 - I was there."

davematt
12-08-2012, 06:54 PM
Yes. 100% and that number doesn't do it justice.

I've always been extremely proud of my country and the opening ceremony was an absolute masterpiece that struck a chord with every patriotic bone in body and set up what would be an absolutely wonderful games.

From Glover and Stanning to Wilson, Stott and Bailey, I have been overwhelmed by every athlete to pull on a Team GB jersey and represent the nation in sports that I really had little to zero interest in before the games. I have cheered on every athlete in a whole variety of different sports and every single one of them has made me proud (with the exception of the football team who I had zero interest in and little pride to say they hail from our isles).

The events which I am naturally drawn to and have always been interested in in the hockey and the cycling have also been fantastic and seeing the glee on the girls' hockey team when they won bronze on friday was a joy to behold. I've told my mates who will listen for years how strong they are and how proud the hockey and cycling athletes are to represent their country, be it England or GB and they have more than lived up to my billing. I am so proud of them.

I have been so overwhelmed by the spectacle on the television that I knew I had to go east to London to experience it for myself and on tuesday I went to the triathlon and I must say the atmosphere was immense. Second to none. I think I will look back on my decision to go to watch the triathlon and then sit and watch the afternoon and evening events in the BT Hyde Park Arena and think that it was one of the best decisions of my life. I would have kicked myself to have missed out on experiencing the utter utter feel good factor and sense of national pride that was, to be honest, almost tangible - and that wasn't even in one of the venues!

Hearing the national anthem sung so loud and so proud and seeing the athletes visibly overwhelmed with joy during the medal ceremonies were moments that made me so proud to be British. It was so obvious when our medalists were on the podium that they really were representing us, the people of Great Britain, and were honoured to do so.

The unity that the games have instilled in the country is the cherry on top, 99.9% of the country are, at this very moment in time, inspired by what has occurred these last 16 days and by God I hope that continues. I have never felt more at home in a country that I have never ever felt out of place in, and whilst that may seem odd, for me that is an absolutely marvelous accomplishment of the games. We live in what is a very proud country, but a country that is very quick to put itself down and often needs a reminder of just how great it really is, and this summer we have been given a reminder that I hope we will never ever forget. The country needed a lift and it has got more than that from these games and I am so so pleased and proud to have been alive during them and to have been able to be a part of them, however small my part might have been, I am over the moon to be able to look back and say "London 2012 - I was there."

Ok, the closing ceremony was supposed to set me off, but this has already done it.

What a fantastic post.

AJ's right boot
12-08-2012, 06:56 PM
Yes. 100% and that number doesn't do it justice.

I've always been extremely proud of my country and the opening ceremony was an absolute masterpiece that struck a chord with every patriotic bone in body and set up what would be an absolutely wonderful games.

From Glover and Stanning to Wilson, Stott and Bailey, I have been overwhelmed by every athlete to pull on a Team GB jersey and represent the nation in sports that I really had little to zero interest in before the games. I have cheered on every athlete in a whole variety of different sports and every single one of them has made me proud (with the exception of the football team who I had zero interest in and little pride to say they hail from our isles).

The events which I am naturally drawn to and have always been interested in in the hockey and the cycling have also been fantastic and seeing the glee on the girls' hockey team when they won bronze on friday was a joy to behold. I've told my mates who will listen for years how strong they are and how proud the hockey and cycling athletes are to represent their country, be it England or GB and they have more than lived up to my billing. I am so proud of them.

I have been so overwhelmed by the spectacle on the television that I knew I had to go east to London to experience it for myself and on tuesday I went to the triathlon and I must say the atmosphere was immense. Second to none. I think I will look back on my decision to go to watch the triathlon and then sit and watch the afternoon and evening events in the BT Hyde Park Arena and think that it was one of the best decisions of my life. I would have kicked myself to have missed out on experiencing the utter utter feel good factor and sense of national pride that was, to be honest, almost tangible - and that wasn't even in one of the venues!

Hearing the national anthem sung so loud and so proud and seeing the athletes visibly overwhelmed with joy during the medal ceremonies were moments that made me so proud to be British. It was so obvious when our medalists were on the podium that they really were representing us, the people of Great Britain, and were honoured to do so.

The unity that the games have instilled in the country is the cherry on top, 99.9% of the country are, at this very moment in time, inspired by what has occurred these last 16 days and by God I hope that continues. I have never felt more at home in a country that I have never ever felt out of place in, and whilst that may seem odd, for me that is an absolutely marvelous accomplishment of the games. We live in what is a very proud country, but a country that is very quick to put itself down and often needs a reminder of just how great it really is, and this summer we have been given a reminder that I hope we will never ever forget. The country needed a lift and it has got more than that from these games and I am so so pleased and proud to have been alive during them and to have been able to be a part of them, however small my part might have been, I am over the moon to be able to look back and say "London 2012 - I was there."What a great post :sob: :)

cantspell
12-08-2012, 07:00 PM
Great post Dan 27

I went to the football and triathlon and both were superb. Vey proud - IOC must be pleased they gave it to us.

civil eagle
12-08-2012, 07:08 PM
Yes, as an example my 8 year old daughter who is a bit of telly addict is booked to go to sportss camp next week; reason she wanted us to swap our plans and let her go so she can be like Beth Twedle and Jessica

Blind_Eagle
12-08-2012, 07:19 PM
Yes, as an example my 8 year old daughter who is a bit of telly addict is booked to go to sportss camp next week; reason she wanted us to swap our plans and let her go so she can be like Beth Twedle and Jessica

Awesome.

Now that's "legacy". :lux:

LLCOOLSTEVE
12-08-2012, 07:30 PM
With all due respect, the question is ridiculous.

Richwak
12-08-2012, 07:33 PM
simply put... perfect

mattheagle
12-08-2012, 07:35 PM
I've never been massively into athletics but I loved every minute of this, enjoying every day more than the last. I couldn't get tickets in the end but went up to Hyde Park yesterday to see Mo and it was incredible!

After all this I sat back and thought 'Wow, if I thought this was good, imagine how good a world cup in Qatar could be.....'

Nelson Muntz
12-08-2012, 07:43 PM
It's all going to come crashing down when McCartney bores the World to sleep with Hey ******* Jude in about 2 hours !!

civil eagle
12-08-2012, 07:50 PM
I think a huge thank you needs to go out to Seb Coe, Tony Blair, Borris, (God know that was hard to type) LOCOG and particularly the Forces who came in at the last minute and the Games makers.

These games have, I hope, changed this wonderful city forever.

I for one will never forget it and be glad to be able to say in years to come 'I was there'

cross_eyed_ed
12-08-2012, 07:51 PM
Tomorrow will feel very odd and empty without it, that's for sure.

Roadblock
12-08-2012, 08:07 PM
It's been magnificent.

Dingle
12-08-2012, 08:25 PM
Loved every minute of it. A once in a lifetime event and i'm absolutely kicking myself I never bothered to even try and get tickets. :( Still, i've watched an awful lot of it on the tv and it's been amazing.

civil eagle
12-08-2012, 09:06 PM
Would love to hear from the ex pats on how the games have gone down where they live

maestro
12-08-2012, 09:29 PM
It was brilliant, all the venues looked absolutely fantastic.

Big Blue Eagle
12-08-2012, 11:15 PM
I think a huge thank you needs to go out to Seb Coe, Tony Blair, Borris, (God know that was hard to type) LOCOG and particularly the Forces who came in at the last minute and the Games makers.

These games have, I hope, changed this wonderful city forever.

I for one will never forget it and be glad to be able to say in years to come 'I was there'

Said similar on another thread, Cameron and Boris have done well, but haven't given credit to Ken and Tone who got the thing in the first place.

Daft overall question, fabulous games.

Hedgehog
12-08-2012, 11:21 PM
Would love to hear from the ex pats on how the games have gone down where they live
Speaking from the US, I would say the man in the street is pretty oblivious to it - I know the talk at work was they enjoyed the opening ceremony.

The media seem very happy with everything, and seem to not have had any complaints.

Having said this, it is almost like a traveling road show - they pretty much seem to live in a cocoon of their own making - they could be anywhere in the world and make it seem like a little piece of America.

Will be interesting what co-workers made of the closing ceremony tomorrow.

firesign
12-08-2012, 11:21 PM
superb

Hedgehog
12-08-2012, 11:27 PM
My own view point was it has restored some pride in saying I'm from South London... there had become a growing tarnish with many things English to me - Rupert Murdock/News of the World scandal, Banking scandal, BP oil rig (try telling an American BP is not British) and the London riots to name a few.

Reading all the positives on here, seeing the visuals on TV, and seeing the athletes excel has been wonderful to me - more than a few tears of pride and joy shed over the last two weeks.

Shipp Ahoy!
12-08-2012, 11:36 PM
Has London 2012 been a success?

Well I hated the Olympics before it started, it was nothing but mind numbing tediousness which got switched off and was a pure annoyance.

When we won the bid I was initially happy because we had won something, a first for this country! But then very quickly realised that I'd be paying for it and then even more so would have it shoved down my throat non stop for months in the build up and ten times as much during the two weeks it was on.

I complained non stop, I bitched, I moaned and I hated it more than I did before.

The opening ceremony came and I couldn't help but watch... I loved it! Well fair enough I thought, a big party with lots of fun, shows and music of course.

I knew I would only watch one sport during the Olympics... the football and that after Clyne and Wilf were left out I couldn't help but almost want Pearce and his Premiership wannabe's who sat in reserve teams picking up a pretty penny doing feck all fail. Yet day by day an event would pop up that I would end up watching. Cycling, canoeing, sailing, boxing, running, tennis...

Before you knew it a GB flag flew outside my house... then inside and finally one actually hung over the England flag still hanging behind my TV after the Euro's. My pride was at being British and not English for the first time I can ever remember.

Come the closing ceremony and once again I was sat in front of my TV having turned down the chance to go see the Dark Knight rises, a film I've wanted to see for months if not years. What was this? Sadness!? A feeling deep inside that wrenched me slightly as I saw the Olympic flag lowered and the torch extinguished. A flash of jealously at the Brazilians and a few bitter comments after their presentation that it would be nothing like our games...

Was the Olympics a success? Well we won a lot of medals... other than that I couldn't tell you...

:) ;)

Joooe
12-08-2012, 11:47 PM
I was hugely excited in the build up to it - despite the predictable cynics seemingly hoping for failure - and it didn't let me down.

In fact it was even better than I could have imagined.

Two (and a half) of the best weeks I can remember and the amount of positivity around the place has been surreal!

Can we host this every year....? ;)

Les Butler
12-08-2012, 11:50 PM
Would love to hear from the ex pats on how the games have gone down where they live

All I hear here is how great its been,so many people thought the opening was fantastic (Sorry Sir Paul not you mind) and people have said you must be proud of the whole games, I fecking am !

Well done to all fantastic Job,give it a week or two and the moaners will be going on about the money etc when most who thought it was great will remember but have had enough of talking about it but we all will know they (the moaners) are a tiny few like always.

Shipp Ahoy!
12-08-2012, 11:52 PM
(Sorry Sir Paul not you mind)

So so true :(

herts_palace
13-08-2012, 12:12 AM
Absolutely brilliant. Ok the 29 gold medals helped but even if we hadn't got so many this would have gone down as a great games for me. To cap it off I managed to go to 5 different events so I felt part of the whole experience. GB can feel very proud that we did such a good job.

Really impressed with the organisation which must be difficult with this sort of thing.

Special mention to the Volunteers who made everyone feel that they were not at an ordinary event.

racehorse-80s
13-08-2012, 12:17 AM
The competition side and the raising of national moral was successful but was it worth cost and has it helped the economy ?

racehorse-80s
13-08-2012, 12:17 AM
The competition side and the raising of national moral was successful but was it worth cost and has it helped the economy ?

PeterH
13-08-2012, 12:28 AM
Would love to hear from the ex pats on how the games have gone down where they live

Very well in Chile.

London nd the UK getting a lot of praise.

Hedgehog
13-08-2012, 12:41 AM
...but was it worth cost and has it helped the economy ?
Only time will tell - I'm sure there a lot of "soft" incomes that are hard to quantify.

Apparently the LA games made a profit, but not sure how.. a lot of corporate and TV rights stuff I guess.

petertaylor11
13-08-2012, 01:53 AM
I think it's been an absolute triumph.
What looked to be well run events, big enthusiastic crowds, cheerful volunteers and decent weather.
GB cleaning up with medals obviously didn't hurt either.
Talking to mates who worked events or attended they have nothing but good things to say.
Coe (and his army) did superbly.

On a side note Blatter's probably shitting himself Qatar got the bid over England. It would have been almost as good.

Casablancas
13-08-2012, 08:54 AM
Would love to hear from the ex pats on how the games have gone down where they live

Very well in Egypt. We made quite a big thing of it at the British Council and the turnout was great - even though its Ramadan. People have been watching it in the shisha cafes round our way - especially the big events and the ceremonies. They were all a bit embarrassed about those wrestlers that turned up late mind!

For myself, I've never been so patriotic, nor so homesick. It looked class.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 08:59 AM
I think it's been an absolute triumph.
What looked to be well run events, big enthusiastic crowds, cheerful volunteers and decent weather.
GB cleaning up with medals obviously didn't hurt either.
Talking to mates who worked events or attended they have nothing but good things to say.
Coe (and his army) did superbly.

On a side note Blatter's probably shitting himself Qatar got the bid over England. It would have been almost as good.

The IOC's choices have generally put FIFA to shame in recent years......

ChiswickEagle
13-08-2012, 09:27 AM
It has been superb. I was watching the start of the marathon yesterday and the atmosphere was so good we jumped on the tube to go and watch, it was brilliant. I have been to hockey, basketball and cycling, memories that will last long.

I suspect that those who snipe the most did not bother to go and see any events and now rather feel that they have missed out.

Thanet Eagle
13-08-2012, 09:56 AM
Loved every minute of it. Here's hoping the games leave a long lasting legacy.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 10:05 AM
Interesting bit on Nicky Campbell this morning. Now of course the BBC has its duty of balance so there had to be some dissenting voices on how great it is. One trotted out the per capita cost myth - they always miss out the lottery cash and sponsor income when they do the sums, but one said that it will all be forgotten soon and no one will remember.

Everyone bit back - how anyone can forget their personal spine tingle moment is beyond me. Just as I remember Gazza's goal at Euro 96, Dougie's goal at Stockport, AJs goal at Cardiff, Freddie & Brett Lee in the Ashes, Senna's lap at Donington, there are moments during the last two weeks that anyone who witnessed then will remember, they are in the national psyche for ever now.

scro
13-08-2012, 10:08 AM
They have been a masterful display in marketing and testimony to the theory that if you tell people something enough they start to believe it.

They have been well organised. They have been entertaining. There hasn't actually been a "great atmosphere around the country/across london" they probably aren't "the best games ever". Those things are in peoples minds because they have been told this over and over and over some more.

I didn't want them as i thought they were too expensive and the long term and financial benefits were vastly over stated. I still believe that will be the case and I still believe they were funded unfairly and cost too much.

The Misfit
13-08-2012, 10:15 AM
I enjoyed them but now I'm glad they're over and we can get back to normal life again.

scro
13-08-2012, 10:22 AM
It has been superb. I was watching the start of the marathon yesterday and the atmosphere was so good we jumped on the tube to go and watch, it was brilliant. I have been to hockey, basketball and cycling, memories that will last long.

I suspect that those who snipe the most did not bother to go and see any events and now rather feel that they have missed out.

I too watched the marathon go near my home yesterday. I honestly don't understand what you thought was so great about the atmosphere. No more atmosphere than the london marathon. Which is a mildy atmospheric occasion where people cheer people on.

I am sure the atmosphere has been pleasant and the it seemed most people have shared an enjoyment of the event. I suppose the feel good factor created by the hard sell on atmosphere is no bad thing really i do think its funny though. It's taken a lot of money to create this "atmosphere".

I think it's interesting how the media and government can whip up a collective fervour over a number of years and create something that makes people believe in a feel good factor. It is an absolute dream come true for David Cameron being prime minister and having the chance to milk it for all its worth. The same for Boris as London mayor.

Nelson Muntz
13-08-2012, 10:25 AM
AJs goal at Cardiff
Doh....!

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 10:26 AM
I too watched the marathon go near my home yesterday. I honestly don't understand what you thought was so great about the atmosphere. No more atmosphere than the london marathon. Which is a mildy atmospheric occasion where people cheer people on.

I am sure the atmosphere has been pleasant and the it seemed most people have shared an enjoyment of the event. I suppose the feel good factor created by the hard sell on atmosphere is no bad thing really i do think its funny though. It's taken a lot of money to create this "atmosphere" though.

Jesus you must be fun at a party.........couldn't go up there yesterday but the atmosphere looked fantastic and that was confirmed by friends who were there. Do you believe that people are so stupid to just cheer because Steve Cram and Brendon Foster tell them to?

ChiswickEagle
13-08-2012, 10:27 AM
I too watched the marathon go near my home yesterday. I honestly don't understand what you thought was so great about the atmosphere. No more atmosphere than the london marathon. Which is a mildy atmospheric occasion where people cheer people on.

I am sure the atmosphere has been pleasant and the it seemed most people have shared an enjoyment of the event. I suppose the feel good factor created by the hard sell on atmosphere is no bad thing really i do think its funny though. It's taken a lot of money to create this "atmosphere" though.

No hard sell for the Marathon, free to watch. The atmoshphere was better for this Marathon as the runners did circuits so you saw them more than once and the crowd was more condensed. I watched in Leadenhall Market, music playing, pubs open, perfect.

scro
13-08-2012, 10:39 AM
No hard sell for the Marathon, free to watch. The atmoshphere was better for this Marathon as the runners did circuits so you saw them more than once and the crowd was more condensed. I watched in Leadenhall Market, music playing, pubs open, perfect.


You miss my point slightly. I am not suggesting the games weren't succesful.. in fact they clearly are succesful as far as them being the olympic games is concerned.

My thoughts are mixed on the whole thing though. Basically you get awarded the games.. vast amounts of money are spent whipping the country up into a wholly engineered fervour over the years you prepare and then the games arrive and the media play their part in feeding the whole machine. I don’t think it would have to be the Olympics you could do so with all sorts of events. However only really the Olympics allows you the free hand financially that is required.

No one will actually pay more than a cursory glance as to whether the event was actually any good for us in real terms. Perhaps the feel good thing is enough. Who knows. I think its clever for sure.

scro
13-08-2012, 10:42 AM
Jesus you must be fun at a party.........couldn't go up there yesterday but the atmosphere looked fantastic and that was confirmed by friends who were there. Do you believe that people are so stupid to just cheer because Steve Cram and Brendon Foster tell them to?

I don't think its a case of people being stupid.. I do think its almost a case of being told to cheer though.

How many people watch the world judo championships? very few.. yet for two weeks every 4 all of a sudden you win a medal in that and the whole country is behind you and you are a star. Its extremely clever indeed.

firesign
13-08-2012, 10:44 AM
and that is a bad thing?

Chocky
13-08-2012, 10:44 AM
Get rid of the pointless events of race walking, syncronised drowning slags, hop skip and jump and the steeplechase and it would've been perfect.

scro
13-08-2012, 10:46 AM
and that is a bad thing?

Possibly it is all rather expensive. I don't think it did the greeks too many favours.

However maybe you are right.. I do like to be contrary about this type of thing. I like my sport and the mrs getting into it always unsettles me deeply. Luckily she back away when its all done and leaves me to beer and sport again ;-).

Chocky
13-08-2012, 10:47 AM
Race walking. Just f**king run you wankers.

scro
13-08-2012, 10:49 AM
Get rid of the pointless events of race walking, syncronised drowning slags, hop skip and jump and the steeplechase and it would've been perfect.

This is the genius of the whole thing though!!

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 10:49 AM
I don't think its a case of people being stupid.. I do think its almost a case of being told to cheer though.

How many people watch the world judo championships? very few.. yet for two weeks every 4 all of a sudden you win a medal in that and the whole country is behind you and you are a star. Its extremely clever indeed.

I think you are missing the point of the Olympics completely. For the vast majority of these sports the Olympics is the ultimate test, the ultimate championship. Yes, they have world series, world championships, but the Olympic medal is the one they cherish most of all, and the one the fans most want to see. That is why they are so enthusiastically supported and have so many people watching them. They are also part of a wider event so inevitably attract casual supporters as well.

Its not "manufactured" it is human nature and enthusiasm.

scro
13-08-2012, 10:49 AM
Race walking. Just f**king run you wankers.

They basically do.. just try and avoid the judges catching them.

scro
13-08-2012, 10:52 AM
Its not "manufactured" it is human nature and enthusiasm.

Sorry I disagree wholly with this point. It is very much manufactured.

You have to group the pinnacle of most of these sports together because they are so irrelevant on the whole to most people.

The Misfit
13-08-2012, 10:53 AM
Get rid of the pointless events of race walking, syncronised drowning slags, hop skip and jump and the steeplechase and it would've been perfect.
You forgot the dancing horses.

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 10:57 AM
Speaking from the US, I would say the man in the street is pretty oblivious to it - I know the talk at work was they enjoyed the opening ceremony.

The media seem very happy with everything, and seem to not have had any complaints.

Having said this, it is almost like a traveling road show - they pretty much seem to live in a cocoon of their own making - they could be anywhere in the world and make it seem like a little piece of America.

Will be interesting what co-workers made of the closing ceremony tomorrow.


My understanding is NBC edited out the silence and memorial to the 7/7 victims in the opening ceromony and then suggested viewer google Tim Berners-Lee as they didn't know who he was. Unbelievable!

The Gerry Queen
13-08-2012, 10:59 AM
They have been a masterful display in marketing and testimony to the theory that if you tell people something enough they start to believe it.

They have been well organised. They have been entertaining. There hasn't actually been a "great atmosphere around the country/across london" they probably aren't "the best games ever". Those things are in peoples minds because they have been told this over and over and over some more.

I didn't want them as i thought they were too expensive and the long term and financial benefits were vastly over stated. I still believe that will be the case and I still believe they were funded unfairly and cost too much.

It has been a great time to bury very bad news ! The coverage on the BBC has been so intense and has had a huge emphasis on celebration and partiotism ( almost to propaganda levels) to the exclusion of much in depth world news of any kind. A news holiday if you like. It will be interesting to see how the Olympics may have changed the way news is reported on the BBC in the future ?

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 11:01 AM
Sorry I disagree wholly with this point. It is very much manufactured.

You have to group the pinnacle of most of these sports together because they are so irrelevant on the whole to most people.

Your use of "manufactured" suggests some global conspiracy when in fact it is promoting human excellence and endeavour.

Why should smaller sports (in this country - sports like Judo, Handball etc are huge elsewhere) not get a wider audience?

The Misfit
13-08-2012, 11:08 AM
The view from around the world:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-19238284

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 11:09 AM
Sorry I disagree wholly with this point. It is very much manufactured.

You have to group the pinnacle of most of these sports together because they are so irrelevant on the whole to most people.

In a way you are right. Taekwondo? What? Who does that? Well a whole lot more kids today might want to having seen Jade Jones take gold and do it with such a smile on her face.

Horse dancing, sorry Dressage, not my thing, looks ridiculous but there could be some kids out there who love their horses but cannot do cross country or jumping and think - i could give that a try.

We all know you can run 100 metres, ok nowhere near as quick as Usain, but whilst they are the marquee sports/races, it is the fringe events that will probably get the biggest boost.

Can we remove the elitest, you must go to Eton the Oxford or Cambridge in order to row mentality and strengthen our depth or rowers? Can we get kids interested in a sport, any sport that improve the overall health of the nation?

Your criticism is the very essence of the Olympics and i am sorry you have missed its point so spectacularly.

scro
13-08-2012, 11:17 AM
Your use of "manufactured" suggests some global conspiracy when in fact it is promoting human excellence and endeavour.

Why should smaller sports (in this country - sports like Judo, Handball etc are huge elsewhere) not get a wider audience?

Equally why should they at my expense? I am being slightly devils advocate and provocative with that point mind. They are marginal sports and therefore don't generally get a wider audience for that very reason.

As for conspiracies... the games I am sure is not short on those.. Much like fifa and the world cup.

scro
13-08-2012, 11:19 AM
In a way you are right. Taekwondo? What? Who does that? Well a whole lot more kids today might want to having seen Jade Jones take gold and do it with such a smile on her face.

Horse dancing, sorry Dressage, not my thing, looks ridiculous but there could be some kids out there who love their horses but cannot do cross country or jumping and think - i could give that a try.

We all know you can run 100 metres, ok nowhere near as quick as Usain, but whilst they are the marquee sports/races, it is the fringe events that will probably get the biggest boost.

Can we remove the elitest, you must go to Eton the Oxford or Cambridge in order to row mentality and strengthen our depth or rowers? Can we get kids interested in a sport, any sport that improve the overall health of the nation?

Your criticism is the very essence of the Olympics and i am sorry you have missed its point so spectacularly.

They didn't even need a swinging clock on a chain to hypnotise you.

Surely no one actually believes that elitist sports like equestrianism will have the class barrier cast aside because of the olympic spirit and its legacy?

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 11:26 AM
They didn't even need a swinging clock on a chain to hypnotise you..

You are in a massive minority position so might be advised against throwing insults. We have just seen the best of British, a brilliant spectacle of sport and human enthusiasm and you want to put a downer on it. I am sorry but that is such a shame.

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 11:28 AM
Surely no one actually believes that elitist sports like equestrianism will have the class barrier cast aside because of the olympic spirit and its legacy?

Well a rower with a gold medal who went to state school and i don't think went to uni is certainly a good way to start.

So yes i do believe it is possible and i hope that clubs and associations do try to bring down the class barriers to sport.

Now who's for a game of Polo?

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 11:28 AM
Equally why should they at my expense? I am being slightly devils advocate and provocative with that point mind. They are marginal sports and therefore don't generally get a wider audience for that very reason.

As for conspiracies... the games I am sure is not short on those.. Much like fifa and the world cup.

They may be marginal in the UK, and more so in your world, lots of my friends kids do judo, taekwondo etc and I played basketball at school, but these sports are massively popular in other countries. If you hadn't noticed, this is a global event, not just for us.

And as for the marathon, well, millions of people go running every week so maybe they just enjoyed seeing the best at running in the world and got excited, just like, I presume, you get excited at Palace?

Toby Jug
13-08-2012, 11:28 AM
Wasnt looking forward to the Games but after watching the amazing opening ceremony i got hooked. Last few days dragged out a little but Mo Farah brought things back to life again. Our Olympians are inspiring and make massive sacrifices for very little if any financial rewards. This time last year i was in Malta watching the Riots accross the country on TV and was truly ashamed to be British. The Olympics have brought back the pride in our Great Country and it has been great seeing so many Union Jack flags on display everywhere.

scro
13-08-2012, 11:30 AM
You are in a massive minority position so might be advised against throwing insults. We have just seen the best of British, a brilliant spectacle of sport and human enthusiasm and you want to put a downer on it. I am sorry but that is such a shame.

Insult?

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 11:31 AM
They didn't even need a swinging clock on a chain to hypnotise you.

Surely no one actually believes that elitist sports like equestrianism will have the class barrier cast aside because of the olympic spirit and its legacy?

Charlotte Dujardin - double gold medalist - very elitist..........

Born in Enfield, she grew up and was educated at a comprehensive school in Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire. She started riding as a two-year old,[2] getting her elder sisters horses back from the show jumping ring to the horse box.[3] Aged three, she came second in her first Pony Club show jumping competition.[3] To finance their hobby, their mother Jane would buy ponies for her daughters to ride, and then sell onwards for a profit to allow them to continue riding.[4]

Leaving school aged 16,[5][6] Dujardin won the Horse of the Year Show competition four times and was a winner at Hickstead on three occasions.[6][7]

After encouragement from trainer Debbie Thomas,[2] she took up dressage on a horse her parents bought for her from monies inherited from her grandmother's estate.[4][3] In February 2007, after asking questions of established dressage rider and horse trainer Carl Hester,[2] he gave her some lessons and then offered her a job as a groom at his yard in Newent, Gloucestershire, where she has been based ever since.[5][6][3] Her own main horse is Fernandez.[2]

scro
13-08-2012, 11:35 AM
They may be marginal in the UK, and more so in your world, lots of my friends kids do judo, taekwondo etc and I played basketball at school, but these sports are massively popular in other countries. If you hadn't noticed, this is a global event, not just for us.

And as for the marathon, well, millions of people go running every week so maybe they just enjoyed seeing the best at running in the world and got excited, just like, I presume, you get excited at Palace?

My son does judo and i run.. My point is more that this is an event that is extremely well marketed and pushed to an extent I cannot recall any event in my lifetime having been pushed.

Do I hate the sports? No. Do i care about them that much? not really. Do I mildly enjoy the olympics? Yes. I just am unsure i buy into the way its presented and the money that is spent on it and the way that money is raised and the lies that are told when raising it.

I do personally believe people have been heavily influenced into the experience. I don't think there is any real sensible discussion about what criteria the games success should be measured.

ChiswickEagle
13-08-2012, 11:36 AM
My son does judo and i run.. My point is more that this is an event that is extremely well marketed and pushed to an extent I cannot recall any event in my lifetime having been pushed.

I do personally believe people have been heavily influenced into the experience.

Presume you don't have Sky Sports?

scro
13-08-2012, 11:38 AM
Charlotte Dujardin - double gold medalist - very elitist..........

Born in Enfield, she grew up and was educated at a comprehensive school in Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire. She started riding as a two-year old,[2] getting her elder sisters horses back from the show jumping ring to the horse box.[3] Aged three, she came second in her first Pony Club show jumping competition.[3] To finance their hobby, their mother Jane would buy ponies for her daughters to ride, and then sell onwards for a profit to allow them to continue riding.[4]

Leaving school aged 16,[5][6] Dujardin won the Horse of the Year Show competition four times and was a winner at Hickstead on three occasions.[6][7]

After encouragement from trainer Debbie Thomas,[2] she took up dressage on a horse her parents bought for her from monies inherited from her grandmother's estate.[4][3] In February 2007, after asking questions of established dressage rider and horse trainer Carl Hester,[2] he gave her some lessons and then offered her a job as a groom at his yard in Newent, Gloucestershire, where she has been based ever since.[5][6][3] Her own main horse is Fernandez.[2]

An exception that proves the rule... one that also had enough family inheritance and support to buy and keep a horse!!

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 11:39 AM
Any World Cup, the Premiership, the Ashes, the Ryder Cup, Wimbledon, the World Series, The NBA, Euro 96, F1....

All sports are promoted and marketed. The key difference is that the organisers of London 2012 are going to TRY and make something lasting out of it, which is very different to most games have done in the past. They may not succeed, but I am confident that they will try, and I really don't think anyone is lying, and I am a rampant anti Tory.....

firesign
13-08-2012, 11:40 AM
My son does judo and i run.. My point is more that this is an event that is extremely well marketed and pushed to an extent I cannot recall any event in my lifetime having been pushed.

Do I hate the sports? No. Do i care about them that much? not really. Do I mildly enjoy the olympics? Yes. I just am unsure i buy into the way its presented and the money that is spent on it and the way that money is raised and the lies that are told when raising it.

I do personally believe people have been heavily influenced into the experience. I don't think there is any real sensible discussion about what criteria the games success should be measured.

your main criticism seems to be that it was a success!

scro
13-08-2012, 11:40 AM
you get excited at Palace?

I'll let you know when the next exciting thing happens there ;-)

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 11:40 AM
An exception that proves the rule... one that also had enough family inheritance and support to buy and keep a horse!!

So getting ten grand from your late gran makes you a member of the elite, yeah right..........

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 11:41 AM
Insult?

Yes that i must have been hynotised, a state whereby someone is not in control of their own mind. I have been fully in control of my mind about the Olympics and i disagree with you.

scro
13-08-2012, 11:43 AM
your main criticism seems to be that it was a success!

No my main problem is the way its funded and the lies that are told. Then to go with that we get the relentless propaganda to try and prevent the real benefit being scrutinised.

scro
13-08-2012, 11:45 AM
Yes that i must have been hynotised, a state whereby someone is not in control of their own mind. I have been fully in control of my mind about the Olympics and i disagree with you.

Don't be so sensitive, it wasn't meant as a personal insult. Merely being jovial and highlighting my point.

You regurgitrated much of the propaganda which i am cynical about. Thats all. I don't fear having a minority view by the way.

scro
13-08-2012, 11:46 AM
So getting ten grand from your late gran makes you a member of the elite, yeah right..........

Ten grand? where did she keep this horse the back garden?

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 11:47 AM
No my main problem is the way its funded and the lies that are told. Then to go with that we get the relentless propaganda to try and prevent the real benefit being scrutinised.

Which funding stream do you disagree with?

Which exact lies have been told?

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 11:49 AM
Ten grand? where did she keep this horse the back garden?

For the last 5 years at Carl Hester's yard where she has been a groom.

Lots of people keep horses in yards for litte/no money in return for spending many hours working there.

scro
13-08-2012, 11:55 AM
Which funding stream do you disagree with?

Which exact lies have been told?

I disagree that London taxpayers paid much more.

People tell all sorts of lies about the financial benefit of the games, Increase in tourism. There are plenty of lies about legacy as well.

I am deeply cynical that the games represent value for money when you actually assess their impact and effect. I don't think there is a reasoned debate on the subject generally.

The op asked if the games had been a success. I am not sure the measures that are used amongst the "powers that be" and "the media" are really relevant to me. I also feel that the masses are somewhat blinded to the real success criteria should be

I admit that its only my opinion at this point but then i think judging the games success is a matter of opinion. As it isn't just a case of whether the thing ran smoothly and if we won some medals.

scro
13-08-2012, 11:56 AM
For the last 5 years at Carl Hester's yard where she has been a groom.

Lots of people keep horses in yards for litte/no money in return for spending many hours working there.

You are proving further to me. How inaccessible a past time this is for the average person.

jone-zee
13-08-2012, 11:59 AM
You are proving further to me. How inaccessible a past time this is for the average person.

No its not at all.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 12:02 PM
You are proving further to me. How inaccessible a past time this is for the average person.

You are increasingly coming across as a Troll on this thread

eagle mart
13-08-2012, 12:04 PM
If you were tired of the Olympics you were tired of life.

It was quite simply the best thing to happen to London in years / decades / generations. Yes the Royal wedding was magnificent and the Jubillee - although, of course that was down to personal choice.

Never seen London on such a high, or so many people brought together. I dont know a single person who didnt want it to end. It's been a magnificent buzz - maybe the lows of last summer have helped us enjoy this high? (A bit like supporting Palace in a way - experience the lows to appreciate the highs more)

This is someone who had no opinon on the Olympics, until the Torch came throguh our area. I really have have done nothing much other than watch BBC1, 2 & 3.

I wonder whether Footballers are feeling a bit left out on the side, and humbled by the experience? Watching these athletes at the pinnacle, of their sports. Several levels above most footballers in comparison, just so thankful and grateful for everything that comes their way – scrimping and saving trying to get funding – money/greed has never been their motivation.

All that doubt; was it ever really in doubt? Could we host a two week International cmopetition? We did so and made it our own.

scro
13-08-2012, 12:07 PM
No its not at all.

I have little knowledge of the criteria but as i understood the situation. You have to have a horse of sufficient quality to get into the olympic team? Is that correct.

So if you want to make it to the olympics you have to first of all be able to afford horse riding lessons (where i live they cost a fortune). Then it appears you would need to get a horse and either work for its keep or afford its keep to achieve a sufficient level to be considered good at it. Then finally you need to be able to get a horse good enough to be selected in the olympic squad, so presumably you either get a lucky find or you have a few to select from or you pay a large amount for a specific horse.

From the outside it seems fairly elitist to me.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 12:08 PM
And there is the additional fact that a significant number of transport improvements were accelerated due to the games which will have a long term benefit for London

scro
13-08-2012, 12:09 PM
You are increasingly coming across as a Troll on this thread

I agree and i certainly feel uncomfortable debating the eilitist nature of the sports as that isn't really my point relating to whether the olympics should be judged a success or not.

I am also getting bored of my own argument. So will stop discussing.. I just genuinely hold the view that the success criteria are skewed by propaganda. (LAST POST PROMISE :-)).

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 12:10 PM
I have little knowledge of the criteria but as i understood the situation. You have to have a horse of sufficient quality to get into the olympic team? Is that correct.

So if you want to make it to the olympics you have to first of all be able to afford horse riding lessons (where i live they cost a fortune). Then it appears you would need to get a horse and either work for its keep or afford its keep to achieve a sufficient level to be considered good at it. Then finally you need to be able to get a horse good enough to be selected in the olympic squad, so presumably you either get a lucky find or you have a few to select from or you pay a large amount for a specific horse.

From the outside it seems fairly elitist to me.

Most of the horses, just like in horse racing, are not owned by the riders, who are selected on the basis of horsemanship rather than money - but that won't make a difference to your view.

The Misfit
13-08-2012, 12:11 PM
I disagree that London taxpayers paid much more.

People tell all sorts of lies about the financial benefit of the games, Increase in tourism. There are plenty of lies about legacy as well.

I am deeply cynical that the games represent value for money when you actually assess their impact and effect. I don't think there is a reasoned debate on the subject generally.

The op asked if the games had been a success. I am not sure the measures that are used amongst the "powers that be" and "the media" are really relevant to me. I also feel that the masses are somewhat blinded to the real success criteria should be

I admit that its only my opinion at this point but then i think judging the games success is a matter of opinion. As it isn't just a case of whether the thing ran smoothly and if we won some medals.
I think you raise some good points. I'm certainly not sure there has been any financial benefit to hosting the games (especially not for businesses elsewhere in London - we visited a normally busy Tapas bar on the South Bank during the 1st week and we were the only couple in there for an hour) but I guess this can be quantified when the BoE releases its quarterly figures later this year.

Legacy is harder to quantify (and depends on what is actually meant) and will only be known after several years.

And what about the "feelgood" factor? Very subjective and again, only really possible to be objectively assessed (if at all) in several months time - will we still be basking in the afterglow or will it all seem like a distant dream from which we eventually awoke to the harsh economic realities of the world we currently inhabit?

No answers from me then, but I do appreciate the questions you are trying to ask but that people don't really want (or perhaps aren't ready) to contemplate at the moment.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 12:18 PM
So - success............

Venues delivered on time - check
Venues viewed as world class - check
Athletes had a great time - check
Athletes performed and broke records - check
Home team did well - check
Spectators had a great time - check although some ticketing issues
Transport worked - check
No terrorist or security issues - check
World thinks GB did a great job - check
Positive image of GB and London created - check
Boris didn't make too much of a prat of himself - check

The only open issues would appear to be funding which you seem deeply upset by and felt lied to about (presumably on the original budget vs the actual spend?) and the legacy (sporting and economic) which no one can yet know.

Other than that you seem to be against seeing any sport that isn't mass market (so that just football then?) and seem to believe that the vast majority of BBSers have been brainwashed into loving the Games.

It should also be pointed out that the Games are the ONLY major spoting event where there is NO advertising in any of the venues, and ence on any of the TV coverage - which is refreshing even if the corporate sponsorship control does get a bit heavy handed sometimes.

Jules
13-08-2012, 12:18 PM
You are increasingly coming across as a Troll on this thread

He really isn't; he's making plenty of valid and well-reasoned points. I don't have the time or energy to join in for long, but I mostly agree with what he has said.

I had a very enjoyable day at the Olympic Park watching hockey and would have been happy to go to other events had I got the tickets I applied for. I am trying to get tickets for the Paralympics too. But the fact is, these games cost a fortune and won't leave us with much more than some happy memories.

The trouble is, it's just sport, which is just a hobby or past-time; it really isn't that big a deal. If it gets kids involved in playing more sport then that's great. My concern is that kids will adopt the likes of Jess Ennis as a role model because they want the glory and acclaim she has received, not because they have any wish to do years and years of training (and probably end up as an also-ran, in any case). The rest of us will just watch more sport, which is far from life-changing in any positive way.

We're also left with the usual potential white elephants of stadia and arena. We will see if anything useful is done with all of those.

jone-zee
13-08-2012, 12:20 PM
I have little knowledge of the criteria but as i understood the situation. You have to have a horse of sufficient quality to get into the olympic team? Is that correct.

So if you want to make it to the olympics you have to first of all be able to afford horse riding lessons (where i live they cost a fortune). Then it appears you would need to get a horse and either work for its keep or afford its keep to achieve a sufficient level to be considered good at it. Then finally you need to be able to get a horse good enough to be selected in the olympic squad, so presumably you either get a lucky find or you have a few to select from or you pay a large amount for a specific horse.

From the outside it seems fairly elitist to me.
Can understand why it may appear elitist especially to townies etc ;) It did to me as well up until a while back however knowing people that go riding take part in competitions I can assure you that its not beyond the reach of the average person.

scro
13-08-2012, 12:28 PM
Most of the horses, just like in horse racing, are not owned by the riders, who are selected on the basis of horsemanship rather than money - but that won't make a difference to your view.

My apologies then, if that is the case. It was a comment from Clare Balding that lead me to this conclusion. She was talking about one of the ladies riding and she stated that that this was her only chance as the horse she owned was a once in a lifetime find owing to her relatively small resources when compared to the others.

scro
13-08-2012, 12:30 PM
Can understand why it may appear elitist especially to townies etc ;) It did to me as well up until a while back however knowing people that go riding take part in competitions I can assure you that its not beyond the reach of the average person.

My lack of knowledge when it comes to showjumping and horse riding has undermined my points somewhat :clown: ...

My overall cynicism about the olympics remain though (damn I think i promised not to post about those again ;-)).

Adlerhorst
13-08-2012, 12:33 PM
My favourite part was Scro deriding the cost of horse riding lessons near where he lives when he lives in Zone 1.

One of my friends lives in the UAE, I imagine he's equally irate about the cost of mountaineering lessons.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 12:38 PM
QUOTE JULES:


He really isn't; he's making plenty of valid and well-reasoned points. I don't have the time or energy to join in for long, but I mostly agree with what he has said.

It was a bit tongue in cheek but I'm not sure he is making the points that well - just plain disagreeing

I had a very enjoyable day at the Olympic Park watching hockey and would have been happy to go to other events had I got the tickets I applied for. I am trying to get tickets for the Paralympics too. But the fact is, these games cost a fortune and won't leave us with much more than some happy memories.

That is always a danger, but I do not think that will be the case. You do sense a shift in national mood, and anyway, at a time of a recession, improving people's mood and perception of us a nation is going to have a positive. However, in Stratford and the Lea Valley they have a huge upside

The trouble is, it's just sport, which is just a hobby or past-time; it really isn't that big a deal. If it gets kids involved in playing more sport then that's great. My concern is that kids will adopt the likes of Jess Ennis as a role model because they want the glory and acclaim she has received, not because they have any wish to do years and years of training (and probably end up as an also-ran, in any case). The rest of us will just watch more sport, which is far from life-changing in any positive way.

If all they see in Jess is glory and acclaim it will be very sad. Not everyone will be a success, BUT is 20% of those who try develop a love of the sport and carry on either participating or coaching/volunteering we will be moving forward. But it is also about generally getting a buzz out of physical activity (not between the sheets....). I used to do a weekly council evening class which included a circuit session, plus a game of 5 a side, volleyball etc etc - these should be encouraged - they make use of school facilities out of hours, are cheaper than gym membership and also have a wider spread of sports - now is the time to strike and just aspire to improve general health.

We're also left with the usual potential white elephants of stadia and arena. We will see if anything useful is done with all of those.

Not sure where the white elephants come from. I believe that all venues bar the main stadium are resolved, and many were existing or temporary anyway.

scro
13-08-2012, 12:40 PM
[QUOTE=Big Blue Eagle]Other than that you seem to be against seeing any sport that isn't mass market (so that just football then?) and seem to believe that the vast majority of BBSers have been brainwashed into loving the Games.

/QUOTE]

I think its more that we have been beaten into a false interest in certain sports via relentless years of propaganda then hours of intense propaganda during the games themselves. However again that isn't really relevant. I don't really care if the next man wants to get over joyed about a silver medal in judo. Good for you I suppose.

My main point about success is how that is measured and how the "feel good" factor that the propaganda creates is a great way for real success measures to be ignored. I don't personally at this point believe the games warranted the expense or will deliver the outcome that many jumped on the bandwagon of to justify the expense.

I think it was unfairly funded and unfairly ticketed with that funding in mind (Londoners had no advantage in getting tickets etc.). I think a lot of lies are told and a lot of misleading information produced along the way. I am an olympics cynic (obviously).

I enjoyed having sport on telly the whole time as opposed to homes under the hammer or what have you. I just didn't buy in with quite the fervour that many people clearly did.

JDawg
13-08-2012, 12:41 PM
People can argue all that they like about whether it represents value for money, etc. etc. However once the bid was approved and the documents signed with the IOC back in 2005, we were committed to hold it and the bid had the budget in it.

The whole concept behind the Olympics is providing a four year challenge to a range of sports from the mainstream to the slightly bizarre. Again when we signed up that's what we took on.

The job since 2005 has been to stage the games per the specification.

So putting this all to one side - as this was relevant in 2005; did London stage a sucessful games?

Its very hard to argue otherwise. Hardly a thing went wrong, everybody seemed to have a good time, and the general mood has been much better. Even the Aussie journalists reckon this was better than Sydney.

The one thing I find perplexing is that I believe (could be wrong) that Rogge described respectively Sydney, Athens and Beijing as the best ever games in his closing speech. He stopped short of this for London. Given the near universal praise heaped upon the city and the games I'm struggling to see why he stopped short. He appears to be in a very small minority.

I also think that this is a bit of a kick for LOCOG who did an exemplarary job, to tthe extent that Rio are trying to hire a bunch of them for the 2016 games.

Palace Kebab
13-08-2012, 12:41 PM
I disagree that London taxpayers paid much more.

People tell all sorts of lies about the financial benefit of the games, Increase in tourism. There are plenty of lies about legacy as well.

I am deeply cynical that the games represent value for money when you actually assess their impact and effect. I don't think there is a reasoned debate on the subject generally.

The op asked if the games had been a success. I am not sure the measures that are used amongst the "powers that be" and "the media" are really relevant to me. I also feel that the masses are somewhat blinded to the real success criteria should be

I admit that its only my opinion at this point but then i think judging the games success is a matter of opinion. As it isn't just a case of whether the thing ran smoothly and if we won some medals.

Your points are valid, but contrary to what you suggest, this is a subject that is being widely discussed all across the media and will continue to be so in the months ahead. As you point out, 'success' is completely open to interpretation and not wholly measureable. Surely those telling 'lies' are just interpreting things in a certain way. Like any cost benefit analysis, how do you put a finite value on everything without room for a debate?

It seems more a case of personally, you did not think it a worthwhile expense. The masses that you describe are simply the majority that think otherwise - surely it is up to them what influences they wish to take? After all we are not being sold propaganda that is negative, the messages are largely positive.

The Olympics can change history, opinions and culture forever. Think of the black power salute in 1968 and this year's games have been great for women of some countries as they have seen female athletes compete for the first time. The Olympic ideals offer a mostly positive influence and can help break down barriers.

scro
13-08-2012, 12:42 PM
My favourite part was Scro deriding the cost of horse riding lessons near where he lives when he lives in Zone 1.

One of my friends lives in the UAE, I imagine he's equally irate about the cost of mountaineering lessons.


OI!! leave your insider knowledge out of this ;-)

scro
13-08-2012, 12:45 PM
One other thing I have found really annoying is french announcements. Not only that we had them but we had them before the english ones!!

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 12:46 PM
The one thing I find perplexing is that I believe (could be wrong) that Rogge described respectively Sydney, Athens and Beijing as the best ever games in his closing speech. He stopped short of this for London. Given the near universal praise heaped upon the city and the games I'm struggling to see why he stopped short. He appears to be in a very small minority.

I also think that this is a bit of a kick for LOCOG who did an exemplarary job, to tthe extent that Rio are trying to hire a bunch of them for the 2016 games.

No - that was the old bribery king Juan Antonio Samaranch who made a bit of a thing about every game being the best ever - and looked a bit of a dick because of it. Rogge stopped doing this when he took over.

Adlerhorst
13-08-2012, 12:47 PM
Pierre de Coubertin is to blame for that.

http://www.transparencyinsport.org/pierre_de_coubertin.jpg

Impressive tache though.

scro
13-08-2012, 12:47 PM
Your points are valid, but contrary to what you suggest, this is a subject that is being widely discussed all across the media and will continue to be so in the months ahead. As you point out, 'success' is completely open to interpretation and not wholly measureable. Surely those telling 'lies' are just interpreting things in a certain way. Like any cost benefit analysis, how do you put a finite value on everything without room for a debate?

It seems more a case of personally, you did not think it a worthwhile expense. The masses that you describe are simply the majority that think otherwise - surely it is up to them what influences they wish to take? After all we are not being sold propaganda that is negative, the messages are largely positive.

The Olympics can change history, opinions and culture forever. Think of the black power salute in 1968 and this year's games have been great for women of some countries as they have seen female athletes compete for the first time. The Olympic ideals offer a mostly positive influence and can help break down barriers.


Perhaps you are right with most of your response. Although I feel there are lies told to suit agenda's and justify costs along the way.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 12:47 PM
One other thing I have found really annoying is french announcements. Not only that we had them but we had them before the english ones!!

Bottom, scraping, barrel ................:o

weltklasse
13-08-2012, 12:49 PM
And there is the additional fact that a significant number of transport improvements were accelerated due to the games which will have a long term benefit for London

like the cable car? lol

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 12:49 PM
Perhaps you are right with most of your response. Although I feel there are lies told to suit agenda's and justify costs along the way.

I am really interested - what lies? The only lie if you want to call it that was the very original budget.

firesign
13-08-2012, 12:49 PM
and the French stuff will continue in Rio and wherever has it after that - it's just the way it is

scro
13-08-2012, 12:50 PM
People can argue all that they like about whether it represents value for money, etc. etc. However once the bid was approved and the documents signed with the IOC back in 2005, we were committed to hold it and the bid had the budget in it.

The whole concept behind the Olympics is providing a four year challenge to a range of sports from the mainstream to the slightly bizarre. Again when we signed up that's what we took on.

The job since 2005 has been to stage the games per the specification.

So putting this all to one side - as this was relevant in 2005; did London stage a sucessful games?

Its very hard to argue otherwise. Hardly a thing went wrong, everybody seemed to have a good time, and the general mood has been much better. Even the Aussie journalists reckon this was better than Sydney.

The one thing I find perplexing is that I believe (could be wrong) that Rogge described respectively Sydney, Athens and Beijing as the best ever games in his closing speech. He stopped short of this for London. Given the near universal praise heaped upon the city and the games I'm struggling to see why he stopped short. He appears to be in a very small minority.

I also think that this is a bit of a kick for LOCOG who did an exemplarary job, to tthe extent that Rio are trying to hire a bunch of them for the 2016 games.


My sister works for LOCOG. She previously worked on the Vancouver winter games. It is my understanding that this is quite common for people to globe trot and work on successive olympics even at a relatively low level.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 12:50 PM
like the cable car? lol

Not seen it - but seem to remember people saying similar things about the Eye in 2000............and anyway, the cable car was a last minute add on, not the core underground/overground modernisations.

firesign
13-08-2012, 12:51 PM
My sister works for LOCOG. She previously worked on the Vancouver winter games. It is my understanding that this is quite common for people to globe trot and work on successive olympics even at a relatively low level.

you mean the organisers like to employ people with experience of doing similar stuff???????? :eek:

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 12:51 PM
We're also left with the usual potential white elephants of stadia and arena. We will see if anything useful is done with all of those.

The aquatic centre will take over from Crystal Palace as elite swimming complex in SOuth east england. Crystal Palace has been in decline for many years and having a new venue will hopfully help future swimmers. The question is what happens to Crystal Palace?

The Basketball arena was built out of Steel and recyclable plastic, and can when taken down be erm recycled.

The BMX track will have its seating removed and remain as part of the cycling centre at the site allowing our most talented BMX riders have a purpose built training base.

The Copper box already has a tennant for after the games and will become a mutlipurpose sports hall.

Eton Dorney was already Eton schools lake and used by them, clubs and athletes for training, the seating will be removed.

Hadleigh Farm will be scaled down but may still be used for wider use of moutain bikers.

The sand from horseguards is going tro be used to build 36 courts within the M25 to encourage the take up of the sport.

Lea Valley White Water Centre will remain as one of the worlds premier training and competion venues and is already set to host a world championships in the coming years.

Surrounding the Sdadium 8,000 new homes, a university, business centre and sporting venue will be created. We know that the stadium is to retain the track and host World Athletics in the future. Looks like it will remiani n public ownership and with a tennant - likely to be West Ham.

Smurf-Turf hockey pitches are being relocated to form a new world hockey venue.

The Velodrome will remian and allow the country 2 top cycling venues, although the cycling HQ will remain in Manchester.

The waterpolo arena will either be reused or reloacted, is made out of recycled material and designed to be reused.

The orbit will remain as a tourist attraction and was financed by the Mittals.

Unlikely to have white elephants, just good sporting facilities.

firesign
13-08-2012, 12:54 PM
also - the 2015 European Hockey Championships will be hosted at the Riverbank Stadium and the 2017 World Athletics Championships will be held at the Olympic Stadium.

A bid has been put forward to stage the 2016 European Swimming Championships at the Aquatics Centre and the 2016 World Track Cycling Championships at the Velodrome - plus, a bid is being considered for London to host the 2017 European Basketball Championships

scro
13-08-2012, 12:59 PM
I am really interested - what lies? The only lie if you want to call it that was the very original budget.


The original budget is a biggy of course but also I personally felt we were sold the games as londoners on the basis that this would benefit the economy and that we would see increase in tourism around games time etc etc. This seemed to be a common theme despite the fact that limited research showed that this isn't the case for host cities.

I also think the facilities that are created and the improvements to areas are overplayed. They don't efffect most people. So what if there is an olympic pool in stratford if you live in south croydon.

I also felt we were fooled into believing that the city would not be able to cope with the amounts of people moving about on top of normal traffic. I still believe this was always rubbish and designed to make the city look better and made londoners feel less welcome in their own home.

Londoners paid more because this would benefit them most. I fail to see how i have benefited more than your commuter from epsom. I don't have all the facts but i haven't noticed any significant transport improvements that have benefited me in the slightest for example.

I seem to recall ken promising tickets for londoners. We just got lumped in the same as everyone else. My sons school got 6 tickets to a half sold out football match. Lots of its seemed to be BS to me along the way.

scro
13-08-2012, 01:00 PM
you mean the organisers like to employ people with experience of doing similar stuff???????? :eek:

Well quite.. not sure why I got the :eek: though?

weltklasse
13-08-2012, 01:01 PM
The aquatic centre will take over from Crystal Palace as elite swimming complex in SOuth east england. Crystal Palace has been in decline for many years and having a new venue will hopfully help future swimmers. The question is what happens to Crystal Palace?

The Basketball arena was built out of Steel and recyclable plastic, and can when taken down be erm recycled.

The BMX track will have its seating removed and remain as part of the cycling centre at the site allowing our most talented BMX riders have a purpose built training base.

The Copper box already has a tennant for after the games and will become a mutlipurpose sports hall.

Eton Dorney was already Eton schools lake and used by them, clubs and athletes for training, the seating will be removed.


Hadleigh Farm will be scaled down but may still be used for wider use of moutain bikers.

The sand from horseguards is going tro be used to build 36 courts within the M25 to encourage the take up of the sport.

Lea Valley White Water Centre will remain as one of the worlds premier training and competion venues and is already set to host a world championships in the coming years.

Surrounding the Sdadium 8,000 new homes, a university, business centre and sporting venue will be created. We know that the stadium is to retain the track and host World Athletics in the future. Looks like it will remiani n public ownership and with a tennant - likely to be West Ham.

Smurf-Turf hockey pitches are being relocated to form a new world hockey venue.

The Velodrome will remian and allow the country 2 top cycling venues, although the cycling HQ will remain in Manchester.

The waterpolo arena will either be reused or reloacted, is made out of recycled material and designed to be reused.

The orbit will remain as a tourist attraction and was financed by the Mittals.

Unlikely to have white elephants, just good sporting facilities.
just because you have built good venues will not automatically make them sucessfull/properly utilised (in fact the nsc is a marvellous example of how to manage a venue in totally the wrong way.) I'm not saying its going to be all doom and gloom but the real work starts now (for example in my local area the local council are going to demolish a leisure center and one of the few athletics tracks in the area to develop the land for retail and then build a smaller center and possibly resite the athletics track at a school - not a brilliant message to be sending out to local youngsters.)- oh and have noted that Rio who were going to reuse our basketball arena have no said they dont want it.

scro
13-08-2012, 01:02 PM
Not seen it - but seem to remember people saying similar things about the Eye in 2000............and anyway, the cable car was a last minute add on, not the core underground/overground modernisations.

Intrigue.. so without the olympics you believe we wouldn't modernise these things? What are the improvements that were specifically only possible because we got awarded the games?

Will i be receiving a tax reduction now the games have been paid for?

crenoleagle
13-08-2012, 01:04 PM
The Basketball arena was built out of Steel and recyclable plastic, and can when taken down be erm recycled.


Rio were looking at buying it from us for their games I heard?

scro
13-08-2012, 01:09 PM
Rio were looking at buying it from us for their games I heard?

This could be a great chance to pull a "london bridge" on them. Quick start a rumour the basketball arena was called "selhurst park"

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 01:13 PM
Intrigue.. so without the olympics you believe we wouldn't modernise these things? What are the improvements that were specifically only possible because we got awarded the games?

Will i be receiving a tax reduction now the games have been paid for?

No - but they have been brought forward, and also the question must be asked about whether they would have survived the ConDem slash and burn without the games?

Projects include Thameslink, Victoria Line & DLR upgrades, Kings X upgrades, the Javelin..........

scro
13-08-2012, 01:18 PM
No - but they have been brought forward, and also the question must be asked about whether they would have survived the ConDem slash and burn without the games?

Projects include Thameslink, Victoria Line & DLR upgrades, Kings X upgrades, the Javelin..........

Hang on you slipped one of those over hyped pointless sports in there to fool me :-)...

I don't like this as a justification for the olympics personally. Sounds more like a way of highlighting poor government.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 01:27 PM
The original budget is a biggy of course but also I personally felt we were sold the games as londoners on the basis that this would benefit the economy and that we would see increase in tourism around games time etc etc. This seemed to be a common theme despite the fact that limited research showed that this isn't the case for host cities.

Agree that the budgeting was poor, but once it was worked through later, it has hardly changed, so the lie was actually 7 years ago. On the Tourism side, you could argue that the games have helped this year as the awful weather would have kept people away - however, personally I think that the benefit will be downstream post games as people all over the world have been exposed to London, and the south east and south coast far more than most other games have attempted or managed.

I also think the facilities that are created and the improvements to areas are overplayed. They don't efffect most people. So what if there is an olympic pool in stratford if you live in south croydon.

If you follow that line, I shouldn't care about anything that happens outside a 5 mile radius of my house. Sure, I may not use the pool at Stratford, but I will aim to go to any Championships held at the Olympic Park as will many people. And the jobs, homes and regeneration was always stated to be about the Stratford area, one of London's poorest. If you believe in the principle of taxes being used to the benefit of all then there is no problem. I don't agree with my taxes treating people who smoke themselves to death, but that is our system

I also felt we were fooled into believing that the city would not be able to cope with the amounts of people moving about on top of normal traffic. I still believe this was always rubbish and designed to make the city look better and made londoners feel less welcome in their own home.

The reverse is to see it as good planning. IBM chose to get people to work from home rather than use Southbank. It enabled some work to be done on the location and people to avoid potential congestion issues. The fact that London's transport stood up to the challenge is a big thing, and if there was some over estimation on numbers and disruption to err on the side of caution, then that is a positive. Traffic has been one of the biggest issues at almost every games and for ours to work in one of the most congested cities in the world must be seen as a plus.

Londoners paid more because this would benefit them most. I fail to see how i have benefited more than your commuter from epsom. I don't have all the facts but i haven't noticed any significant transport improvements that have benefited me in the slightest for example.

Other than the transport benefits - which again, are not necessarily personal, if the London economic boost happens, that benefits everyone in London

I seem to recall ken promising tickets for londoners. We just got lumped in the same as everyone else. My sons school got 6 tickets to a half sold out football match. Lots of its seemed to be BS to me along the way.

That was the aspiration, Ken may have promised it but Boris was there when the tickets came out and can't remember what he said at the time. Having said that, ticketing has been an issue I agree - but for all sorts of issues.


Overall - it does come across as, other than the budget, you wanting a very personalised benefit from the games, which was never going to be the case and never will be in anything.

Cleon
13-08-2012, 01:40 PM
My favourite overseas analysis of the Olympics?

"The living conditions for the 2012 Olympic workers have been described as 'prison-like slums'. Every 25 staff members must share one toilet." Iran's Press TV

FraserH
13-08-2012, 02:23 PM
The aquatic centre will take over from Crystal Palace as elite swimming complex in SOuth east england. Crystal Palace has been in decline for many years and having a new venue will hopfully help future swimmers. The question is what happens to Crystal Palace?

The Basketball arena was built out of Steel and recyclable plastic, and can when taken down be erm recycled.

The BMX track will have its seating removed and remain as part of the cycling centre at the site allowing our most talented BMX riders have a purpose built training base.

The Copper box already has a tennant for after the games and will become a mutlipurpose sports hall.

Eton Dorney was already Eton schools lake and used by them, clubs and athletes for training, the seating will be removed.

Hadleigh Farm will be scaled down but may still be used for wider use of moutain bikers.

The sand from horseguards is going tro be used to build 36 courts within the M25 to encourage the take up of the sport.

Lea Valley White Water Centre will remain as one of the worlds premier training and competion venues and is already set to host a world championships in the coming years.

Surrounding the Sdadium 8,000 new homes, a university, business centre and sporting venue will be created. We know that the stadium is to retain the track and host World Athletics in the future. Looks like it will remiani n public ownership and with a tennant - likely to be West Ham.

Smurf-Turf hockey pitches are being relocated to form a new world hockey venue.

The Velodrome will remian and allow the country 2 top cycling venues, although the cycling HQ will remain in Manchester.

The waterpolo arena will either be reused or reloacted, is made out of recycled material and designed to be reused.

The orbit will remain as a tourist attraction and was financed by the Mittals.

Unlikely to have white elephants, just good sporting facilities.

Hadleigh Farm will be used as a permanent mountain bike track as they are removing some of the harder technical sections to make it more amateur friendly. The plan is then to create a whole range of other trails on the same site to create a mountain biking centre.

loz
13-08-2012, 03:12 PM
I think I heard it cost about £320 for every tax payer in the UK…well in my view it was well worth it, with all the gloom and doom around it was great to see everyone enjoying it and the national pride we all felt. How anyone can not have enjoyed watching Jessica , Mo and every single person who competed is beyond me and shows that beneath it all, the UK is a friendly melting pot of creed and colour.

The one negative for me was the football, a lot of my mates watched that instead of the brilliant athletics..you can watch football for 50 weeks of the year FFS!! . I have been failing out of love with football and if you turned over to watch the charity shield game yesterday to watch the highly paid players rolling around cheating sneering and spitting!! The crowd booing and singing hateful songs, it makes me wonder about me and football TBH.

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 03:28 PM
I put this on another of the threads yesterday with some comments on the football angle - realised it also has a place here:

It's been interesting reading through the responses and not surprising that on a football based site football gets defended, but I really do think we have a time and a moment to seize here. Football did it to a degree with Italia 90 and Euro 96, shaking off the hooligan riddled 1970s and 1980s and making the game accessible and attractive again.

To me, there are some big opportunities to grab here.

Political

Dave and Boris have been all over the games like a rash, understandably to a degree, and now Cameron has got off the pot on funding, pledging to honour the funding for elite sport to Rio, but put the amount in context, £120m or so over 4 years, probably less than Man Utd's wage bill.

What would be good would be political unity on this. Major started the Lottery which gives so much to sport. Labour under Blair and Ken won the games and made the commitments. A Tory, Seb, delivered them so well. There are not many examples like that. Maybe the on going development of elite and grass roots sport and physical education can be taken out of the political bun fight.

Not Broken Britain

A year on from the riots, and in tough times, we have shown a positive, smiling Britain to the world with so many examples of triumph over tragedy and struggle. Also many of the stars came through the supposedly bust education system (I know many are also privately educated) while Mo would, in many places be vilified as a Somali refugee. That is very different from the negative and bleak view so often portrayed by Politicans after votes and papers like the Mail. That needs maintaining.

The has also been a lack of England v Scotland v Wales v NI, we have been Team GB, and all the better for it.
Role Models

John Terry? Wayne Rooney? Katie Price? Imogen Thomas? Or Chis Hoy, Jess Ennis, Mo Farah, Ben Ainslie, Tom Daley, Becky Addlington? I know who I look upto, and hopefully that will start to spread. Sportsmen are role models, and the ones at the Olympics are mostly the best you can get.

National vs Tribal

Football is hugely successful, but in our lifetime, mostly, we have never won as a nation. 1966 was a long time ago, unless you are a West Ham fan. We will also probably not host a world cup in most of our lifetimes due to the attitude of FIFA. Chelsea may win the European Cup but most fans are not Chelsea fans so almost want the other team to win. Success is local not national. It has also sold its soul for cash, which some other national sports have done as well. Remember the feeling of regaining the Ashes, watched by millions on C4 vs the much smaller number watching on Sky the next time.

The Olympic sports bring success to the country as a whole, not on one team, and unless we ever get a national team of any quality again, that ain't gonna happen in football, the only sport not to experience that it recent times.

Britain is full of people with crap lives and limited hopes and historically sport had offered people both a financial way out, and a sense of personal pride, often in the past through football, but with so few local youngsters now getting taken on by many clubs (Palce being a shining exception) we need to show that other sports can offer that. And a government that took that up in a major way would be doing the country a huge long term service.

The next few weeks will see football claw back ground inevitably, although the Paralympics will get huge crowds, great coverage and wonderful stories as well.

Maybe football may get some humility, and the government might bottle some of what has gone on during August.
__________________
"I still believe in the need for guitars and drums and desperate poetry" Frank Turner 2011

firesign
13-08-2012, 03:58 PM
good post

LLCOOLSTEVE
13-08-2012, 05:38 PM
The Basketball arena was built out of Steel and recyclable plastic, and can when taken down be erm recycled.






The basketball arena is going to Rio for the next Olympics

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 06:14 PM
The basketball arena is going to Rio for the next Olympics

Question marks remain over that. That is a form or recycling, it may also be re-sited away from the Olympic Park if it doesn't go to Rio.

GreatGonzo
13-08-2012, 06:15 PM
Maybe the on going development of elite and grass roots sport and physical education can be taken out of the political bun fight.


Same could be said about a lot of things but where do you start and stop - not that i disagree with you.

Jonboy
13-08-2012, 06:31 PM
A view from the last Olympic city ...

We heard about the problems with security before the games and there was a lot of comment on the empty seats in the first few days, but overall the impression is of a tremendous success: well managed, well hosted and enough sporting highlights to make everyone happy.

There was a wonderful buzz in Vancouver while the winter Olympics were on and it seems that London was the same. Unfortunately it didn't last here. We look back and say, "Yes, it was great while it lasted." But, life quickly returns to normal.

Vancouver is a smallish city on the edge of the world so name recognition was an important justification for some of the cost. This is hardly an issue for London. Will it be value for money? Is is still way to early to tell yet.

The Vancouver games mostly used existing venues. The two major new ones were the sliding centre near Whistler and the Oval in Richmond. The sliding centre will continue to host competitions on the "world" circuit and be a training ground for future athletes. The Richmond Oval is a stunning building and has been successfully converted to a community sports centre.

We also had two major infrastructure upgrades: a mass transit system from the airport and southern suburbs to downtown and the highway from Vancouver to Whistler. Both of these were not supposed to be expenses related to the Olympics but the funds necessary suddenly became available once we won the games. You have to be a lot less cynical than me to believe they were not connected. However, this is a better place for both.

The Olympic village in Vancouver was built to the highest environmental specifications. After the Olympics it was intended to be a mix of high-end apartments for sale and some limited social housing. The trouble has been that they are far too expensive. Many remain unsold and the city will take a loss unloading the remaining units.

We were promised a big increase in tourism and this just hasn't happened. Some say that the increase in the strength of the Canadian dollar has worked against the promotion of the Olympics and they may have a point.

The Vancouver Olympics made a profit. However, I understand that all Olympic games make a profit - it is just a matter of which costs are Olympic expenses and which are absorbed into city and government budgets.

So, the question of whether or not it made financial sense is still to be decided. However, like you have found, it was a fantastic event to be part of and I am very grateful that I was around to experience it. Most of you sound as though though you feel the same.

JDawg
13-08-2012, 06:41 PM
My sister works for LOCOG. She previously worked on the Vancouver winter games. It is my understanding that this is quite common for people to globe trot and work on successive olympics even at a relatively low level.


Well, it looks like Tfl are advising Rio on transportation issues so there's big stuff too. Add to this the specialist media stuff and it would seem that not only LOCOG did well.

Jonboy
13-08-2012, 06:48 PM
On the legacy.

1) Canada learned that if you fund elite level athletes properly they perform better. Hello? They tried to add funding to the athletes of the summer games but too late to have a significant impact. Hopefully in Rio.

2) I have not seen much evidence of the sort of legacy projects that were talked about beforehand. In some ways it is not surprising. People here are nutty about winter sports in any case.

However, in otherwise rather crap TV coverage in Canada (and thank God CTV have lost the broadcasting rights) there was an interesting story. Clara Hughes, a darling of the country and the only Canadian athlete to win medals in both summer and winter games, told of how her life as a teenager was going the wrong way; failing at school and mixing with the wrong crowd. It was the winter Olympics in Calgary in 88 that inspired her to turn her life around.

Hopefully there are more ...

Joooe
13-08-2012, 07:10 PM
I missing it already. :sob:

Latvian Eagle
13-08-2012, 07:14 PM
Enjoyed every last minute.

Had no intent to watch any of it before it started, but I think it's fair to say I watched something at least every single day.

cantspell
13-08-2012, 07:19 PM
I thought this from Eddie Izaard was great

http://edition.cnn.com/2012/08/13/sport/olympics-eddie-izzard-multicultural-britain/index.html

Chester 76
13-08-2012, 07:30 PM
I think I heard it cost about £320 for every tax payer in the UK…well in my view it was well worth it, with all the gloom and doom around it was great to see everyone enjoying it and the national pride we all felt. How anyone can not have enjoyed watching Jessica , Mo and every single person who competed is beyond me and shows that beneath it all, the UK is a friendly melting pot of creed and colour.

The one negative for me was the football, a lot of my mates watched that instead of the brilliant athletics..you can watch football for 50 weeks of the year FFS!! . I have been failing out of love with football and if you turned over to watch the charity shield game yesterday to watch the highly paid players rolling around cheating sneering and spitting!! The crowd booing and singing hateful songs, it makes me wonder about me and football TBH.
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
This.

The Olympics have been an eye opener the events have shown football in this country (Premiership,Championship,League 1 & 2) to be a poor third even fourth rate event. To be entertained; enjoy the atmosphere; to see officials and opponents respected; to see supporters of different countries intermingle with not the slightest hint of trouble; to see opponents celebrate each others success amongst a number of other things puts football way behind the Olympics.

Gooders
13-08-2012, 07:45 PM
Just settled down to watch some more Olympics.

:(

Big Blue Eagle
13-08-2012, 07:48 PM
A view from the last Olympic city ...

We heard about the problems with security before the games and there was a lot of comment on the empty seats in the first few days, but overall the impression is of a tremendous success: well managed, well hosted and enough sporting highlights to make everyone happy.

There was a wonderful buzz in Vancouver while the winter Olympics were on and it seems that London was the same. Unfortunately it didn't last here. We look back and say, "Yes, it was great while it lasted." But, life quickly returns to normal.

Vancouver is a smallish city on the edge of the world so name recognition was an important justification for some of the cost. This is hardly an issue for London. Will it be value for money? Is is still way to early to tell yet.

The Vancouver games mostly used existing venues. The two major new ones were the sliding centre near Whistler and the Oval in Richmond. The sliding centre will continue to host competitions on the "world" circuit and be a training ground for future athletes. The Richmond Oval is a stunning building and has been successfully converted to a community sports centre.

We also had two major infrastructure upgrades: a mass transit system from the airport and southern suburbs to downtown and the highway from Vancouver to Whistler. Both of these were not supposed to be expenses related to the Olympics but the funds necessary suddenly became available once we won the games. You have to be a lot less cynical than me to believe they were not connected. However, this is a better place for both.

The Olympic village in Vancouver was built to the highest environmental specifications. After the Olympics it was intended to be a mix of high-end apartments for sale and some limited social housing. The trouble has been that they are far too expensive. Many remain unsold and the city will take a loss unloading the remaining units.

We were promised a big increase in tourism and this just hasn't happened. Some say that the increase in the strength of the Canadian dollar has worked against the promotion of the Olympics and they may have a point.

The Vancouver Olympics made a profit. However, I understand that all Olympic games make a profit - it is just a matter of which costs are Olympic expenses and which are absorbed into city and government budgets.

So, the question of whether or not it made financial sense is still to be decided. However, like you have found, it was a fantastic event to be part of and I am very grateful that I was around to experience it. Most of you sound as though though you feel the same.

Well we are coming to Vancouver this summer!

Seriously though, the winter games are a bit different I think, much more compact and a lot smaller in terms of spectators and competitors?

Jonboy
13-08-2012, 08:15 PM
Well we are coming to Vancouver this summer!

I hope you enjoy it. In its own way it is a fabulous city.

Seriously though, the winter games are a bit different I think, much more compact and a lot smaller in terms of spectators and competitors?

Smaller in terms of competitors and spectators for sure. Not necessarily more compact. There is nearly 90 miles between Whistler and Richmond.

However, a lot of the buzz came from the mingling of crowds downtown in Robson Square and Jack Poole Plaza. Compared to the West End of London this was a very compact area.

dan27
13-08-2012, 08:33 PM
Just settled down to watch some more Olympics.

:(

10:35 Tonight, BBC One - London 2012: A Golden Games

To help ween us off :)

EastbourneEagle
13-08-2012, 08:40 PM
My parents are in their late sixties. Dad loves footie and cricket and Mum really isn't that bothered unless frank Lampard is involved. They have been watching the Olympics every day and staying up until midnight. Mum cried at the dressage!! So, I think it's been bloody successful if other people have been doing the same. Bring on the Paralympics!!!!!!

The Misfit
14-08-2012, 08:04 AM
Interesting survey for the BBC which suggests that a majority think the Games were good value, had a positive effect on the UK and made people more proud to be British. However, only 35% think the positive effect will be long term with 54% thinking it will be short-lived.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19246044

Big Blue Eagle
14-08-2012, 08:07 AM
Which backs up the belief that the politicians and sports bodies need to act quickly to capitalise on this or they will lose momentum.

Justin
14-08-2012, 08:29 AM
The competition side and the raising of national moral was successful but was it worth cost and has it helped the economy ?

That is the problem with you lefties, completely obsessed about money!

I went to loads of events and loved every minute of it. I have never been in a stadium before when there had been such noise as there was the night Jessica Ennis and Month Farah won gold. I don't think I ever will forget that unbelievable evening.

Big Blue Eagle
14-08-2012, 08:31 AM
Wonderful piece on the BBC here - fulsome praise from Berlin and Washington, and incredible sour grapes from across the Channel! Still upset about 6th July 2005 I suspect!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19249953

kick it doris
14-08-2012, 10:42 AM
Overall a great success. But obviously issues around swimming where GB performances were poor. Interesting that the athletics lead is considering his position. GB won 6 medals in athletics when targetting 8. Take out the obvious highs (and not so obvious ie womens hammer) and there were a number of mediocre performances from top athletes who more was expected from. Many came to the champs with injuries rather than coming in top shape which does hang a question mark over preparation. For me, too many hung too far back in the pack for the slower middle distance races and then were nowhere when the kick came or couldnt respond. So questions over race tactics too. Itll be interesting to see the verdict when the dust has settled.

The Local track in Croydon has flung its doors open so that entry is free during the olympics which is a great way of getting kids involved. I just wish the mums wouldnt stand on the track with their buggies talking to their mates...

Big Blue Eagle
14-08-2012, 10:56 AM
Overall a great success. But obviously issues around swimming where GB performances were poor. Interesting that the athletics lead is considering his position. GB won 6 medals in athletics when targetting 8. Take out the obvious highs (and not so obvious ie womens hammer) and there were a number of mediocre performances from top athletes who more was expected from. Many came to the champs with injuries rather than coming in top shape which does hang a question mark over preparation. For me, too many hung too far back in the pack for the slower middle distance races and then were nowhere when the kick came or couldnt respond. So questions over race tactics too. Itll be interesting to see the verdict when the dust has settled.

The Local track in Croydon has flung its doors open so that entry is free during the olympics which is a great way of getting kids involved. I just wish the mums wouldnt stand on the track with their buggies talking to their mates...

I think that is a little harsh on both sports.

On athletics, we met the actual target but not Van Commenee's personal target so he is thinking things over, His bosses want him to stay on until 2017.

On performances, there was the Phillips saga and injuries for Goldie Sayers and Yamauchi, and to a lesser extent Dai Green, but there were a number of super performances - the women's 5000 and 10000, the mens 800, the mens 4x400, mens 110H, both pole vaults, women's hammer, men's discus, even Gemili in the mens 100 - lots of best you could expect or great future potential. The ones who maybe missed chances would be the two 1500s, and definately the mens 4x100.

Swimming is a more difficult one. Ian Thorpe gave a good summary when he said look at the depth not just the medals - we made 23 finals, plus the OW, got 3 medals, 4 4ths and 6 5ths in a sport where medals were decided by hundredths of seconds. Yes, some athletes were below their level which needs to be looked at, but it appeared that they seemed to suffer more than any other sport by the pressure in the Aquatic Centre. Have a good review, but with so many swimmers making the final, something is clearly right given that we had, I think, just 1 in Atlanta.

The Misfit
14-08-2012, 11:06 AM
You can't win 'em all.

Fatboy
14-08-2012, 11:44 AM
Overall a great success. But obviously issues around swimming where GB performances were poor. Interesting that the athletics lead is considering his position. GB won 6 medals in athletics when targetting 8. Take out the obvious highs (and not so obvious ie womens hammer) and there were a number of mediocre performances from top athletes who more was expected from. Many came to the champs with injuries rather than coming in top shape which does hang a question mark over preparation. For me, too many hung too far back in the pack for the slower middle distance races and then were nowhere when the kick came or couldnt respond. So questions over race tactics too. Itll be interesting to see the verdict when the dust has settled.

The Local track in Croydon has flung its doors open so that entry is free during the olympics which is a great way of getting kids involved. I just wish the mums wouldnt stand on the track with their buggies talking to their mates...

Many of these atheletes have to peak for qualifying and then have to peak again weeks/months later for the Olympics. Perhaps that takes its toll on some. The mind and body have to be in good shape for a long time and pushing to run faster, jump higher, throw further can result in injuries.

BringBackSasa
14-08-2012, 09:57 PM
Will these Olympic sporting role-models encourage children to be fitter? Have you seen Mo Farah's kid?

firesign
14-08-2012, 10:11 PM
to be fair - it's his step-daughter. Maybe the twins his wife is expecting will be stick thin like he is.

Big Blue Eagle
15-08-2012, 06:54 AM
Will these Olympic sporting role-models encourage children to be fitter? Have you seen Mo Farah's kid?

My nephew and niece looked a little "rotund" at her age, at 20 she is now 5ft 8in and athletic in a tennis player way (ie not stick thin) and at 14 he is 6ft (:eek: ) and getting leaner all the time. Kids change a lot - pretty cheap shot really.

scro
15-08-2012, 09:44 AM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leeds-19260859

LOL!! I didn’t hear gary linekar mention the fact that a british pervert had hassled the Chinese team when reporting on the games. Perhaps he was too pushed for time and needed to fill the “what an atmosphere we have, what a great country we are” statement quota ;-)

Before i get shot down.. I am joking clearly every village has an idiot. This one a rather worrying sex case.

JDawg
15-08-2012, 08:35 PM
OK. Read all of this and the general conclusion is that they were a roaring success. However, there's a lot of carping about the cost and the benefit to the economy.

Consider the following:

The Germans conducted a survey over the effect of medals on national morale and asked people to suggest what they would pay for an Olympic medal with this in mind. The average answer was about 5 Euro. Extrapolate this across a population of 80m and you have 400m Euro. Germany won 44 medals coming 6th (11 Golds). That works out at just over 9m Euro per medal.

Put this in the UK context and a smaller population size and call it £4. That works out at roughly £250m. 65 medals works out at £3m per medal. If you don't believe this as a concept, think about it the next time you buy out a lottery ticket. John Major's legacy has funded British sport for the past decade and has allowed these sports to put in place the structures, coaching and performance needed to win these medals. The national feelgood factor is immense.

Then there's the question of the benefits to the economy. The games cost about £13bn to stage all in. There are the immediate benefits such as the upgrade to the transport system, the re-generation of Stratford and the direct revenues from tourism, ticket sales, merchandizing etc, but this doesn't cover it.

However, it will involve hard work but the potential benefits are huge.

This was the perfect platform to showcase Britain. We know that we are generally introspective people who get on with our lives in our own way whilst tolerating any nonsense others may care to peddle. We also know that there's a widely held stereotype and what with riots, the financial crisis, bailouts etc. etc. etc. our world image had been tarnished. Indeed, following Beijing - where the agenda was entirely different, many and probably us included, thought that we wouldn't be able to stage the games to that standard and that something was bound to go wrong.

Well guess what....Nothing of note went wrong and the fact that the population got right behind these games, and the acclaim from overseas means that the stereotypes and opinions are being revised throughout the world. Delivering these Olympics was no small feat and it was down to a well thought out, well executed and yes well funded plan with attention to detail delivered through hard work and determination. The same is true of the national sporting bodies and their associated athletes which resulted in a medal haul per capita way in excess of everybody else and left a number of other countries wondering how we did it.

This success proves as a nation that we can deliver on this sort of thing and LOCOG has provided the perfect platform for corporate Britain to go out and reap the benefits. If corporate Britain can convince that this is the British mentality then the benefits to the economy will be huge. However, with all things legacy it requires..a well thought out and executed plan, attention to detail and a huge amount of work and a realisation that these benefits won't just happen. Just like the staging of the Olympics and just like the athletes and their associated sporting bodies. We may just surprise ourselves again.