Thread: FISHING THREAD
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Old 13-02-2018, 02:09 PM
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YASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy dietYASSA the PALACETINIAN came here looking for the peace and quiet; the healthy air and the healthy diet
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Originally Posted by EdMan View Post
Looking for some advice.

He's equally keen on freshwater fishing, and has already amassed a bit of kit. But as far as I know carp are pretty dormant at this time of year, and there's not much action to be had.

Any advice as to the best bet for a good fishing experience for him this week? My own knowledge is quite limited, as you may have gathered....

We can go anywhere within a couple of hours of Sth London.
The Fisherman in Winter

To many fishermen the end of the season comes about the 30th September. In a fine year, it might perhaps be prolonged until the end of October. In any case they think of it as an occupation for the leafy months. It is associated in their minds with the hum of bees and the drowsiness of warm days.
This is far from being true, as any winter fisherman can tell you. In winter the otter may still be seen by the lucky fisherman. The heron still stalks about the shallows in search of little fish.
The kingfisher and the dipper have not departed, and in fact the dipper sings more sweetly from December on than it does at any other time.
Many others of the waterside animals are still abroad, even the squirrel that so many believe sleeps the winter through.
It can be seen in all but the hardest weather. There is no dead stop to nature as the town dweller seems to suppose.
When the very last of the bloom and leaf has left the banks, it is only quite a short pause before catkins and the earliest blossoms bestrew it again.
But of course you do not come to the water merely to find a gentle pleasure in landscape and birds and trees. Nor need you do so. You have come to fish and you can do this to very good purpose. Some of your fishes of summer will no longer be feeding and therefore ready to be angled for, but of the others some will show you better sport now than ever they did in summer. And of those properly regarded as summer fish, there are days throughout the winter that will bring them from their torpor unless it be a very hard season.
The tench and the carp are most justly regarded as fish of summer, but there are many of them that have found their way to the fisherman’s keep-net on a mild day in winter. In the south particularly, the middle hours of a warm day will bring them all on feed. Of bream too this is true. On these days, large catches have been made in the heart of winter. As for the barbel, in recent years they have flouted every rule that is said to govern them, by feeding lustily almost throughout the winter. These to many fishermen the end of the season comes about winters, it is true, have been mild, but it is something that it has been well worthwhile to set out specifically to catch barbel at the end of December.
But though all these fishes may provide occasional sport to vary the fisherman’s days, it is not on them that he relies. In most places they are no more than windfalls and it is not for them that a man becomes a convinced winter fisherman. It is for those fish that in the winter reach their
full prime, and only then give the angler the whole sport of which they are capable.
The roach, I suppose, is the most popular fish of all. It is a good fish to fish for in the summer. Its subtlety, the difficulty of its deception, ensure that. But it must be admitted that as a fighter it does not rank very high. In winter, however, it is another fish. Its shy cunning is not in the least blunted, and it develops as well a muscular power unknown in ‘the summer fish. A roach then, of a pound and a half, will show its mettle.
The rudd of winter is equally improved. In fact its showing at the end of a line will be even better than that of the roach. For this is a deeper fish, a more solid and weighty fish. A day with rudd in the closing months of the season can be a red-letter day.
As for the chub, between that of summer and that of winter there is just no comparison. Let us admit that the chub of summer is too often a lank and spiritless thing that gives way with scarcely a struggle. But how different it is in winter. Then a chub of over three pounds will give you all the fight you can want. I have seen many on the Wye, that, seeming irresistible, have plunged to freedom in the roots.
But of all the fishes of winter, there is none perhaps, that so comes into its own as the pike. The limp and flaccid fish of summer becomes a fierce and powerful fighter that inspires thousands of fishermen to its pursuit, whatever the weather.

Tight lines!
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In Roy we trust.

Last edited by YASSA the PALACETINIAN; 13-02-2018 at 02:12 PM.
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