PDA

View Full Version : Football questions, you were always too embarrassed to ask?


TAK
17-10-2001, 07:55 PM
Mine are:

Where does the term Nutmeg come from and why?

and

Why are Everton called the Toffee's?






Can you help and what are yours?

ruediger
17-10-2001, 08:10 PM
ask any Liverpool fan. Everton are so sweet ...

Sweetpea!
17-10-2001, 08:16 PM
I'm not going to start - my list of questions would be endless.

CM_Addicted
17-10-2001, 08:17 PM
Why is 'Eagles' our nickname? :confused:

2can
17-10-2001, 08:19 PM
Why is a freekick sometimes direct and at other times indirect?

Why can a player only play for one team in the cups?

Who is Arthur Waite?

ruediger
17-10-2001, 08:21 PM
Originally posted by CM_Addicted
Why is 'Eagles' our nickname? :confused:

Because we choose to nose-dive in order to pick-up the pieces.

AddiscombeEagle
17-10-2001, 08:21 PM
I think Everton are called the Toffees because some Old Lady used to walk around before the game throwing toffees into the crowd. I might be wrong but that is what I believe.

Stephenson Soundbyter
17-10-2001, 08:22 PM
From an Everton Supporters website

http://www.toffeeweb.com/history/concise/1888-1915.asp

The famous royal blue jerseys with white shorts were first used in 1901-02. This is of course the origin for the nickname "The Blues". In the early days, Everton often trained late into the night, so they were nicknamed "The Moonlight Dribblers", or so it is believed. The scientific style lead to the name "The School of Science". After Everton moved to Goodison, they picked up another nickname, "The Toffees" or "The Toffeemen".

There are two versions to explain how this name was adopted: the better known is that, in those days, a Mrs Noblett had a candy store near Goodison called Mother Noblett's Toffee Shop, and she advertised and sold her tasty merchandise on match days. Another reason might be that there was a house called Ye Anciente Everton Toffee House near the Queen's Head hotel. The word "toffee" also referred to Irishmen, of which there was a large population in the Liverpool area at the turn of the century.

AddiscombeEagle
17-10-2001, 08:23 PM
Free Kicks are either direct or indirect depending on the foul committed. A deliberate handball or blatant foul is direct whereas Obstruction is indirect.

If you looked at the FA rules you would see a lot more technical definition.

ruediger
17-10-2001, 08:24 PM
Originally posted by 2can
Why is a freekick sometimes direct and at other times indirect?

Why can a player only play for one team in the cups?

Who is Arthur Waite?

a) depends on the mood of the ref.
b) a safety measure by the FA to protect players from getting depressive.
c) Arthur Wait is Trolley's father.

New_Malden_Eagle
17-10-2001, 08:27 PM
Originally posted by 2can
Why is a freekick sometimes direct and at other times indirect?

I think it's to do with the type of foul comitted - for example obstructions result in an indirect freekick whereas a handball would be direct. I'm not sure exactly what the rules are though.



Why can a player only play for one team in the cups?

In some situations (eg. Freedman in the Worthless last year) this rule is totally pointless. I'm not sure why it even exists


Who is Arthur Waite?

He was Chairman(?) about 50 years ago.

brighton_eagle
17-10-2001, 08:28 PM
Why is it that highly paid professional footballers (beckham for example) don't seem to be able to take a decent corner more than, say, 10% of the time?

I mean, what exactly DO they do in training?

Txomin Etxaniz
17-10-2001, 08:49 PM
Originally posted by TAK
Where does the term Nutmeg come from and why?

I believe it was first used by the self-styled association football expert summariser Herbert Atkinson during the BBC radio commentary on the 1930 FA Cup Final, live from the viewing gantry of the Graf Zeppelin, to describe the mesmerising skills of Arsenal's Alex James.

Exactly why he described James' trick of poking the ball through the legs of the hapless Sheffield United full back as a nutmeg remains unclear, but it created a tradition of utilising meaningless terms to embellish dull commentaries that survives today, largely thanks to Herbert Atkinson's descendents.

TAK
17-10-2001, 08:56 PM
You're having me on.

AddiscombeEagle
17-10-2001, 09:00 PM
Originally posted by Txomin Etxaniz


I believe it was first used by the self-styled association football expert summariser Herbert Atkinson during the BBC radio commentary on the 1930 FA Cup Final, live from the viewing gantry of the Graf Zeppelin, to describe the mesmerising skills of Arsenal's Alex James.

Exactly why he described James' trick of poking the ball through the legs of the hapless Sheffield United full back as a nutmeg remains unclear, but it created a tradition of utilising meaningless terms to embellish dull commentaries that survives today, largely thanks to Herbert Atkinson's descendents.

Top Work, very funny:)

zonin2000
17-10-2001, 09:12 PM
Originally posted by New_Malden_Eagle
He was Chairman(?) about 50 years ago.


Oh no, as we are currently thinking about rebuilding/building a new stadium, i can just see: The Churchill Insurance Simon (and Dominic) Jordan Stadium....

Matty
17-10-2001, 09:34 PM
Found this answer on the web (Guardian site):

According to none other than popular Sky pundit and former Fulham favourite Jimmy Hill, the expression nutmeg is little more than dodgy rhyming slang," writes Jez Simmonds.

"Nutmeg equals leg, apparently, and was thus coined during the 1940s to describe the skill of placing the ball between an opponent's legs before retrieving it t'other side

Personally I prefer Txomin Etxaniz answer

Al From Bromley
18-10-2001, 12:11 AM
What are early doors and when did a team first set out a stall on the pitch?

braker
18-10-2001, 12:20 AM
Originally posted by 2can

Why can a player only play for one team in the cups?

[/B]

so if a team gets into a cup's latter staes, they dont just bring in players for that competition on loan especially.

braker
18-10-2001, 12:26 AM
Originally posted by 2can

Why can a player only play for one team in the cups?

[/B]

so if a team gets into a cup's latter staes, they dont just bring in players for that competition on loan especially.

SE20
18-10-2001, 03:27 AM
Commentators/managers/players etc are often heard to say "this is a team that came to play football". But what other sport might a football team plan to play on a football pitch during a football match?

Txomin Etxaniz
18-10-2001, 06:35 PM
Originally posted by Al from Bromley
What are early doors and when did a team first set out a stall on the pitch?

Both of these are credited to the legendary association football trainer Herbert Bassett, who led Walton & Hersham to five successive but unsuccessful FA Amateur Cup semi-finals in the 1920s. Bassett is thought to have introduced both terms during his post-match interview with BBC Radio's Herbert Atkinson following the last of these setbacks(the 5-4 extra time loss to Old Wimledonians in the fifth replay of the 1928 semi-final at The Hurlingham Club).

Precisely why he adopted this unusual way to describe his team's strategy in the early stages of the match remains unclear, but it created a tradition of utilising incomprehensible cliches to embellish dull press conferences that survives today, largely thanks to Herbert Bassett's descendents.

brighton_eagle
18-10-2001, 06:40 PM
Originally posted by Txomin Etxaniz


Both of these are credited to the legendary association football trainer Herbert Bassett, who led Walton & Hersham to five successive but unsuccessful FA Amateur Cup semi-finals in the 1920s. Bassett is thought to have introduced both terms during his post-match interview with BBC Radio's Herbert Atkinson following the last of these setbacks(the 5-4 extra time loss to Old Wimledonians in the fifth replay of the 1928 semi-final at The Hurlingham Club).

Precisely why he adopted this unusual way to describe his team's strategy in the early stages of the match remains unclear, but it created a tradition of utilising incomprehensible cliches to embellish dull press conferences that survives today, largely thanks to Herbert Bassett's descendents.

:p

Bobby Woodruff
18-10-2001, 07:01 PM
Originally posted by CM_Addicted
Why is 'Eagles' our nickname? :confused:

Malcolm Allison back in the seventies decided that The Glaziers didn't exactly sound very threatening. Why he decided on Eagles I have no idea but it did work (obviously) unlike his idea of giving the players 'nicknames' in the programme. Lasted about three games if I remember rightly.

Bobby Woodruff
18-10-2001, 07:02 PM
Originally posted by Txomin Etxaniz


Both of these are credited to the legendary association football trainer Herbert Bassett, who led Walton & Hersham to five successive but unsuccessful FA Amateur Cup semi-finals in the 1920s. Bassett is thought to have introduced both terms during his post-match interview with BBC Radio's Herbert Atkinson following the last of these setbacks(the 5-4 extra time loss to Old Wimledonians in the fifth replay of the 1928 semi-final at The Hurlingham Club).

Precisely why he adopted this unusual way to describe his team's strategy in the early stages of the match remains unclear, but it created a tradition of utilising incomprehensible cliches to embellish dull press conferences that survives today, largely thanks to Herbert Bassett's descendents.

Given his proclivity for using the phrases, Herbert Atkinson wasn't a relation of Ron Atkinson by any chance?

Bobby Woodruff
18-10-2001, 07:08 PM
Originally posted by New_Malden_Eagle



He was Chairman(?) about 50 years ago.

Excuse Me! some of us can remember the Arthur Wait stand being built! He was chairman from some time in the early sixties (I believe until about 1975ish. Which is only about 25 years ago!:grrr:

The Blackadder
18-10-2001, 07:12 PM
Originally posted by SE20
Commentators/managers/players etc are often heard to say "this is a team that came to play football". But what other sport might a football team plan to play on a football pitch during a football match?

Ask the kid who invented another popular ball sport at Rugby school some years ago:p :rolleyes:

CM_Addicted
18-10-2001, 07:19 PM
Originally posted by Bobby Woodruff


Malcolm Allison back in the seventies decided that The Glaziers didn't exactly sound very threatening. Why he decided on Eagles I have no idea but it did work (obviously) unlike his idea of giving the players 'nicknames' in the programme. Lasted about three games if I remember rightly.

"The Glaziers" - Was that are old nickname?!

So we've only had our Eagle part some 30-40 years?! Not that long really!

Little Matt
18-10-2001, 07:22 PM
If the ref blows up for half time, why do we hear no 'bang'. And do we get a replacement ref for the second half?

Daniel_Nash
18-10-2001, 07:26 PM
What is offside? :confused:

Why do man U keep changing their kits? :confused:

Why are Charltion so pikey? :confused:

MARKOFBLOCKB
18-10-2001, 07:37 PM
What comes first the chicken or the egg ? it definatley is not my bird

Which top club plays their home games at Borough Briggs?

Why are all Charlton fans Pikey's?

Why do Palace never get any credit when we are doing well?

Why do i have to work with a ginger spurs fan?

Why does everyone (yes most of you lot) think we will lose to Wolves?

Why Millwall?






A bear and a rabbit are in a forest when suddenly a Genie appears and said "you both have 3 wishes each" the bear said "i wish all the bears in this forest were female apart from me" the rabbit wishes for a motorbike. the bear then says "i wish all the bears in this country were female apart from me" the rabbit wishes for a crash helmet. the bear then says "i wish every bear in the world was female apart from me" the rabbit then puts on his crash helmet and starts the motorbike and starts driving away and shouts i wish that bear was gay.

Al From Bromley
18-10-2001, 07:46 PM
On the subject of Glaziers, we actually had a keeper called Glazier once. So it was quite literally "Glazier of the Glaziers".

Norfolk Eagle
18-10-2001, 07:49 PM
Where can I read The Script and find out what's in it?

bucketbongeagle
18-10-2001, 07:49 PM
Why does the linesman check the substitutes studs before allowing him onto the pitch ? as far asI know the ref doesn't go into the changing room and check the starting 22's boots or do they ? I've always played football, amateur obviously but have never known a ref to do this.

Norfolk Eagle
18-10-2001, 07:50 PM
To Al Bromley.........

And don't forget Jimmy Glass!

Maidstoned Eagle
18-10-2001, 07:52 PM
Originally posted by Bobby Woodruff


Malcolm Allison back in the seventies decided that The Glaziers didn't exactly sound very threatening. Why he decided on Eagles I have no idea but it did work (obviously) unlike his idea of giving the players 'nicknames' in the programme. Lasted about three games if I remember rightly.

Big Mal decided to change our image and nickname when he took over. He wanted us to emulate two of the great European teams of the time, therefore our kit changed from claret and blue to Red and Blue stripes ala Barcelona and changed our nickname from "The Glaziers" to "The Eagles" ala Benfica.

One of the main reasons the press don't like to see us do well probably has a lot to do with Uncle Rons attitude to them when he took over at Palace. I remember that once he physically threw a certain Harry Harris of The Daily Mirror out of Selhurst Park and banned him from the ground. Harry was, at the time a well liked and respected sports journalist and since then the press as a whole have adopted a dislike to us.

Dobbo
18-10-2001, 07:57 PM
Why are Celtic & Rangers known as "The Old Firm" ?

AJ
18-10-2001, 08:01 PM
Arthur Waite was more than a Chairman in the 60's. His association with the club goes back to the 1930's or 40's when he joined the club as a Director. As other's left/died he remained and was a real believer in the club.
He was a builder by trade and was instrumental in building the AW stand. Not only did he help raise funds, but, during construction, he could be found on the worksite mixing concrete. Could you see Mr Noades or Jordan doing that?
Waite was probably the most honest, truthful and decent chairman the club has seen and to his credit, I believe he did not intially want the stand named after him.

Matty
18-10-2001, 08:02 PM
Originally posted by Al from Bromley
What are early doors and when did a team first set out a stall on the pitch?

I think early doors is a reference to the cinema years ago when they they let in people early for the first show of the evening ("get in early doors")


I have a question: who was the first Brian (as in "football's a funny old game, Brian"?

Men At Work
18-10-2001, 08:02 PM
Why do players with minor head injuries get treated on the pitch when they can walk off but players who have serious leg injuries get taken off the pitch for treatment?

Txomin Etxaniz
18-10-2001, 08:05 PM
Originally posted by Bobby Woodruff
Given his proclivity for using the phrases, Herbert Atkinson wasn't a relation of Ron Atkinson by any chance?

Have you seen my earlier post on page 1 of this thread regarding the origins of "nutmeg", Bobby?

Al From Bromley
18-10-2001, 08:09 PM
Thats easy. The first Brian was the one in "Life of Brian"...I know cos Ive seen it at the cinema.

CM_Addicted
18-10-2001, 08:10 PM
Originally posted by Men At Work
Why do players with minor head injuries get treated on the pitch when they can walk off but players who have serious leg injuries get taken off the pitch for treatment?

All head injuries have to be treated with more care. Serious head injuries don't always show at first and any movement to a damaged spine can cause serious damage to the spinal cord.

CM_Addicted
18-10-2001, 08:12 PM
Originally posted by bucketbongeagle
Why does the linesman check the substitutes studs before allowing him onto the pitch ? as far asI know the ref doesn't go into the changing room and check the starting 22's boots or do they ? I've always played football, amateur obviously but have never known a ref to do this.

He checks to make sure none of the studs are sharp and dangerous. All players studs are checked before a game - this normally happens when they line up in the tunnel - that is why you don't normally see it.

Pistike
18-10-2001, 08:22 PM
Whats the D for on the edge of the penalty area?

Al From Bromley
18-10-2001, 08:26 PM
Now that IS a good question Pistike! :) I;ve absolutely no idea.

CM_Addicted
18-10-2001, 08:28 PM
Originally posted by Pistike
Whats the D for on the edge of the penalty area?

I was told once, but I can't remember!!

Isnt it something to do with when someone is taking a penalty, you have to be so many yards away. The D is there to stop people being to close to the penalty spot when the kick is being taken.

James Varcoe
18-10-2001, 08:30 PM
Yes it is, the D is so the penalty taker can have an unencumbered run up to the ball.

Al From Bromley
18-10-2001, 08:32 PM
I dont know, I think it would be quite fun if they had to barge and elbow their way thru a few players on the run up! :)

18-10-2001, 09:52 PM
Why does anyone support Wimbledon?

Matty
18-10-2001, 09:54 PM
Does anyone support Wimbledon?

Daddy Long
18-10-2001, 09:55 PM
Are Bobby and Brian Robson really not related? Are you sure about that?

18-10-2001, 10:00 PM
Originally posted by Matty
Does anyone support Wimbledon?
:p

Daniel_Nash
18-10-2001, 10:26 PM
How come Arsenal and Chelsea still play in the English league, when really the term "English" dosn't apply.

Norfolk Eagle
18-10-2001, 10:32 PM
Has anyone ever seen a formbook physically being thrown out of a window?

braker
18-10-2001, 10:40 PM
Originally posted by James Varcoe
Yes it is, the D is so the penalty taker can have an unencumbered run up to the ball.

Its just like a normal free kick, you have to be en yards away from the ball, not to do with the run up

Men At Work
18-10-2001, 10:46 PM
Why do Cardiff, Swansea and Wrexham play in the English leagues when Wales have their own national team? (although it is fairly obvious why Berwick play in the Scottish ones).

Stephenson Soundbyter
18-10-2001, 10:49 PM
Originally posted by braker


Its just like a normal free kick, you have to be en yards away from the ball, not to do with the run up

I thought that but if the penalty spot is on 12 yards and the edge of the area is 18 yards you could stand where the D and penalty area meet and only be 6 yards from the kick, couldn't you?

AJ
18-10-2001, 10:52 PM
Why does a red-card make you leave the field, when a red traffic light(worldwide) means STOP?
Why did refs change colours from black to magenta?
Why do clubs still build "stands"? When in reality they should be called "seats" as everyone now sits?
What exactly does the word offside me?

zonin2000
18-10-2001, 10:52 PM
Originally posted by Stephenson Soundbyter


I thought that but if the penalty spot is on 12 yards and the edge of the area is 18 yards you could stand where the D and penalty area meet and only be 6 yards from the kick, couldn't you?

I think that because of the diagonal distance, you end up being 12 yards away.

now what is the six yard box for? except for goal kicks?

Steve in SF
18-10-2001, 10:54 PM
Why is it called "The Arthur Waite Stand" when you're supposed to sit? Re-naming it would avoid potentially embarassing misunderstandings.Probably.

Benzhiyi
18-10-2001, 11:03 PM
How on earth did the following ever become professional footballers?

Jason Dozzell
IsShit Zohar
Dean Austin
Francis Benali
Ronny Rosenthal
Jason Lee
Vinny Jones

AND How on earth did Dennis Wise and Carlton Palmer play for England!!!!

Daniel_Nash
18-10-2001, 11:57 PM
How can a team defend in numbers?

Do they mean the bible book or they use big cut-outs of "1", "2", "3" etc to protect themselves?

Stephenson Soundbyter
19-10-2001, 12:03 AM
Originally posted by zonin2000


I think that because of the diagonal distance, you end up being 12 yards away.



Are you sure?

Is it true that the penalty taker cannot start his run up further than the edge of the D?

Steve in SF
19-10-2001, 12:10 AM
Why do they call them reserves? Some of them are actually quite outgoing.

Benzhiyi
19-10-2001, 01:00 AM
What the f**k is Big Ron Atkinson on when he commentates? I want in.

James
19-10-2001, 01:19 AM
Originally posted by Stephenson Soundbyter .... I think that because of the diagonal distance, you end up being 12 yards away.


Are you sure?

That is correct. The 'D' is in fact part of a circle, with its centre at the penalty spot. The distance from the penalty spot to every part of the 'D' is the same.

PJ
19-10-2001, 11:29 AM
Originally posted by AJ

Why did refs change colours from black to magenta?


It was a cosmetic change along with squad numbers to give the impression the the game had changed somehow when the Premiership was established when of course the only practical change was in the top club's bank balances.

Why was our previous ground called The Nest ?

Whatever happened to Inside-Forwards ?

If dissent is a bookable offence, why do most players get away with telling linesmen and referees to "f*ck off" ?

Why is/was the number 4 a midfield position when 5 and 6 are usually in defence ?

jrnicholson
19-10-2001, 12:41 PM
what's a "square ball"?

why do some players think taking their shirt off is a suitable way of celebrating a goal?

why do some players chew gum. Don't they know how dangerous it is?

My wife wants to know why players spit all the time. (I've sort of explained to her but can't explain why managers/coaches spit whilst on the sideline)

where can I get a 'magic sponge'?

(The six yard box used to be the goalkeepers 'safe area' where he couldn't be shoulder barged, I think)

TAK
19-10-2001, 01:52 PM
Since when has Israel been in Europe?

UEFA cup???

brighton_eagle
19-10-2001, 01:55 PM
Originally posted by TAK
Since when has Israel been in Europe?

UEFA cup???

No THAT is a very good question......:p

bucketbongeagle
19-10-2001, 02:12 PM
Originally posted by jrnicholson
what's a "square ball"?

why do some players think taking their shirt off is a suitable way of celebrating a goal?

why do some players chew gum. Don't they know how dangerous it is?

My wife wants to know why players spit all the time. (I've sort of explained to her but can't explain why managers/coaches spit whilst on the sideline)


The shirt thing became particularly popular one world cup when someone wore a T-shirt with a photo of his kid on it - I think.

Don't think half the pro footballers are capable of running and chewing at the same time, so the ones that do are just showing off.

Spitting - Ask your wife to run around for 90 minutes, jogging then sprinting, turning etc then ask her why shes breathing heavily and spitting.

PJ
19-10-2001, 06:21 PM
Originally posted by TAK
Since when has Israel been in Europe?

UEFA cup???

Because so many of the countries within the Asian Confederation, which includes the Middle East refuse to recognize Israel as a country, let alone send a football team to play them. Can you imagine the draw for the next World Cup qualification ? Asia Group C: Iran, Israel, Pakistan, Indonesia.

19-10-2001, 06:28 PM
Originally posted by PJ
Whatever happened to Inside-Forwards ?

Not many clubs play 2-3-5 these days.

Daniel_Nash
19-10-2001, 06:56 PM
Originally posted by PJ

Asia Group C: Iran, Israel, Pakistan, Indonesia.

If Palestine gets to be a recognised country...

Afghanistan, Pakistan, Israel, Palestine.

:eek: :eek:

Matty
19-10-2001, 09:26 PM
Originally posted by TAK
Since when has Israel been in Europe?

UEFA cup???

Eurovision song contest?

TAK
19-10-2001, 09:42 PM
My point exactly, you can't blame the Palestinians for being pissed off for not having their own entrant.

Ian of Chatham
19-10-2001, 09:45 PM
Originally posted by Daniel_Nash


If Palestine gets to be a recognised country...

Afghanistan, Pakistan, Israel, Palestine.

:eek: :eek:
Palestine are a recognised country footballwise with their own FA. They were in Group 3 of the Asian World Cup Qualifying competitions but did not get through to the final group stages.

Trolley
19-10-2001, 11:30 PM
Do referees embark on whistle-stop coach journeys ?

Ouch that Hurt!
15-09-2002, 06:07 PM
If a keeper picks up a backpass it is also indirect. In theory the ball also has to travel its whole circumfrance before anther player on the team awarded the free kick can touch it. Though this rarely happens.

Boris the charltonhater
16-09-2002, 02:20 PM
Originally posted by brighton_eagle
Why is it that highly paid professional footballers (beckham for example) don't seem to be able to take a decent corner more than, say, 10% of the time?

I mean, what exactly DO they do in training?

Perhaps these highly paid professional learn how to defend corners in training. :p

Ouch that Hurt!
16-09-2002, 04:17 PM
Rovers? Albion? What are their definitions? I know United is together, and City/Town/County are self explanitary.