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JohnA
10-05-2002, 08:32 PM
Guinness is a subsidiary of multinational Diageo Plc based in London, the owners of Murphy's (Heineken) and Beamish (S&N) must be laughing all the way to the bank

From the Irish Times website:

"Guinness encourage Cameroon to beat Ireland
By Paul Doyle Last updated: 10-05-02, 15:41

Guinness left Irish punters spluttering into their pints this afternoon when they announced cash incentives to Cameroon, Ireland's first World Cup opponents, for good performances in Japan next month.

Guinness Cameroon's Managing Director, Brian Johnson, told journalists in Yaoundé today that the Indomitable Lion who causes most damage to Ireland on June 1st will be awarded $1,000.

The Cameroonian team will be handed $5,000 if they partake of a second round, stand to scoop $10,000 if they make the semis, and will secure $15,000 if they're still around at closing time on June 30th.

"It is entirely appropriate that Guinness should motivate the national team, to bring out the power in them," said Johnson.

The makers of the black stuff will also give $1 million to any African team that lifts the World Cup."

g23
10-05-2002, 08:37 PM
I was in the pub a couple of nights ago when it suddenly struck me that you can't seem to buy a pint of Beamish in London any more. It's by far my favourite of the three, but I can't remember the last time I had one. Inevitably someone on here will know a place with Beamish taps - who wants to help me out?

Sunny Fan
10-05-2002, 09:06 PM
Originally posted by g23
I was in the pub a couple of nights ago when it suddenly struck me that you can't seem to buy a pint of Beamish in London any more. It's by far my favourite of the three, but I can't remember the last time I had one. Inevitably someone on here will know a place with Beamish taps - who wants to help me out?
Will get back to you on that one, I have had one recently, I'm sure. In the meantime, the John Snow does a lovely pint of home-made stout along with its many other home made beers

JohnA
11-05-2002, 02:47 AM
Try a Scottish & Newcastle pub, they own the brand.
Their pubs are "Courage", "Shoeless Joe's", TJ Bernard's. I thought Young's pubs used to carry it, I wonder if they still do.

If you want real Irish stout - try the Porterhouse in Maiden Lane Covent Garden (also in Dublin & Wicklow). They have a few porters the 2 that spring to mind are - "Plain", "Wrassler" (actually Clonakilty Wrassler as drunk by my forebears & also Michael Collins).

selhurstparkflyer
11-05-2002, 03:14 AM
Does anybody else get tired of the patronising attitude shown towards The Republic of Ireland's football team, much like is shown towards its culture?

a.stew
11-05-2002, 09:32 PM
yes !

Ruskin Old Boy
13-05-2002, 03:16 PM
Originally posted by selhurstparkflyer
Does anybody else get tired of the patronising attitude shown towards The Republic of Ireland's football team, much like is shown towards its culture?

Yes! Will be in Dublin for the rest of the week and am looking forward to that first pint of Guiness in Buswell's tomorrow afternoon:) :)

g23
14-05-2002, 04:59 PM
Thanks Sunny, John. Might be in the Porterhouse area this evening I think. Yum.

JohnA
15-05-2002, 01:32 AM
Originally posted by selhurstparkflyer
Does anybody else get tired of the patronising attitude shown towards The Republic of Ireland's football team, much like is shown towards its culture?

Never really noticed it - I avoid Tory clubs and the Torygraph, Sun & Mail ;)

King Tubby
16-05-2002, 03:20 PM
Guinnes is Welsh!!

From the Washington Times:

LONDON - It's enough to drive the Irish to drink - Guinness, favored by generations of poets, thinkers and romantics as the elixir of the Emerald Isle, turns out to have been invented by the Welsh.

Maybe.

As people around the world prepare to put away thousands of gallons of Ireland's most famous export on St. Patrick's Day, the startling claim that tipplers should be tracing leeks rather than shamrocks on their pints has been made by the inhabitants of a Welsh town.

Locals from Llanfairfechan, Wales, claim to have identified the site of a tavern from where Arthur Guinness stole the recipe for his famous stout in the 1750s.

For its part, the Guinness company is unable to discount the theory.

The company's official history says Arthur Guinness developed his taste for dark ales on visits to London, where he drank a brew called porter, named after the porters of Covent Garden.

Some have suggested that before Guinness established his brewery in Dublin in 1759, he may have converted the Irish to porter by importing it from London.

But Welsh historian Deiniol ap Dafydd says it would not have made commercial sense for Guinness to transport porter all the way from London, as the cost would have put the drink beyond most pockets.

The claim has been given added weight by the identification of the site where Arthur Guinness is believed to have stopped on the last leg of his journeys to Holyhead, England, where he boarded a ship for Dublin.

Two cottages are still standing - one, known as laety, the Welsh, word for "place of rest," was where the mail coach stopped overnight, and the other was then a tavern where a local black ale was brewed. That building is still known by its original name - Gwyn du, or "black wine."

Mr. Ap Dafydd said: "The ale was renowned for being much darker, smoother and deeper than porter - much more like what we know today as Guinness. My view is that Mr. Guinness tasted a whole range of local brews on his journey between London and Holyhead, but it was the black wine that took his fancy. It is what was to become Guinness!'

Peter Edmondson, who runs the garden center in Llanfairfechan, added that old maps of the town show three malting sites used by the pub. "They would have produced far more malt than could ever have been needed in what was then a village of a few hundred people," he said. The surplus could have been going to Ireland.

A spokesman at the Irish Embassy in London, which will be serving Guinness at an official St. Patrick's Day reception on Friday, is fairly sanguine about the Welsh claim: "I don't think anyone will be worrying about its origins come Friday."

And the Llanfairfechan tourist site: http://www.llanfairfechan.org.uk/guinness.htm
can't copy and paste that though.