Thread: Brexit
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Old 23-01-2017, 03:34 PM
cockneyrebel cockneyrebel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hpalace View Post
I can see your point CR but there is a couple of factors that have to be taken into account. In the USA everyone is paid in dollars. There is variation from state to state as to how many dollars per hour a 'job is worth' and variation from state to state as to cost of living. Now if you have a scenario that all of a sudden a US carpenter directly competes against a carpenter that walks into the US from Haiti, previously paid in the gourde then those variations become much more exaggerated.

In the case of the EU there was little complaint (as far as I can recall) about FOM when it was just the original states. These complaints started when the East European nations joined as all of a sudden another more extreme factor was thrown into the mix. Rightly or wrongly the perception was that a 25 year old Polish carpenter could treble his wages by moving to the UK and still undercut the 25 year old UK born carpenter. For me given further investment in the EU over time these extreme balances would have become less exaggerated. Unfortunately the majority did not agree with me.

I for one have to constantly compete with people massively undercutting the services I offer. FOM or no FOM this will continue to be the case. I can live with this but I can also kind of understand why others have had enough and were not prepared to give it more time. If for instance we had FOM with Malawi it would not work unless serious investment went into Malawi and wages began to get close/equal to those in the UK.
Not sure different currencies have much to do with it. Ireland don't have the same currency but I think should keep their FOM rights.

Also people go from Alaska and Hawaii and Puerto Rico to the mainland USA. I think the variation in rates and inequality could well be larger from state to state in the USA than country to country in the EU.

I think it's just as much rubbish that 25 year old plumber from Poland undercuts wages, than a 25 plumber from a poor US state going to a rich US state. Or a poor area of China to a rich area of China.

The thing that will stop companies screwing over workers are strong unions and workers rights. This could have been achieved in a far better way in a global economy across Europe than in one country.

Last edited by cockneyrebel; 23-01-2017 at 03:37 PM.
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